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Thread: My Grandad's Kriegsmodell bnz 45 -- Photos

  1. #1
    Junior Member Windage&Elevation's Avatar
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    Default My Grandad's Kriegsmodell bnz 45 -- Photos

    Hi Everyone,

    I'm new to the Kar98k forum, and I have to say I've been extremely impressed with the knowledge of its members, and their willingness to share that encyclopedic knowledge with newbies like me.

    With that in mind, I thought I'd share a few photos of my grandfather's S block bnz45.

    IMG_20140319_104121_581.jpgIMG_20140319_103848_710.jpgIMG_20140317_094342_747.jpg

    It was given to him by an Army chaplain, who'd been with U.S. forces as they fought from Normandy to VE Day. Apparently, the chaplain shared the rumors of sabotage at the Steyr-Daimler-Puch factory by the slave laborers. This impressed my grandfather sufficiently that he never actually fired the rifle. But he did plan to someday sporterize the rifle, which thankfully, he never got around to doing.

    My grandfather passed the rifle along to his son (my uncle), who in turn gave it to my older brother. Neither of them ever fired it, either, but like my grandfather, they did take very good care of it nonetheless. A couple of years ago, I asked my brother about the rifle's background, history, etc., but he'd never researched it. No one in my family were terribly impressed by the rough finish of the metalwork and stock; it was hardly the precision we associated with German engineering, and I think we all valued it as a piece of history and an heirloom, but believed its roughness meant it wasn't worth much otherwise.

    Last October, my brother offered to give me the rifle, but since my grandfather had intended him to have it, I declined. I did offer to act as caretaker, so I could do some research, and perhaps even fire a few rounds through it. Since then, I've joined this board and a couple of others, and discovered how knowledgeable the members are. I've learned that the very rough qualities we thought made our Kriegsmodell not terribly valuable, are in fact the qualities that make it so collectible. We have no intention of ever selling the rifle, and intend to hand it down to a deserving member of the next generation. But I'm grateful to the members of the forum for any and all help filling in the blanks about the rifle's history.

    All serial numbers appear to match (the barrel, receiver, bolt, sights match, but I haven't disassembled it yet). The stock does not appear to have ever been finished or varnished. The bore is bright, crisp and spotless. The ten rounds I put through it at the range were definitely the first ones put through the rifle in 69 years, and possibly the first ever. It shoots pretty straight, by the way.

    Again, I'm pleased to be a new member of the Kar98k forum, and grateful for any and all comments regarding our grandfather's Kriegsmodell.
    Last edited by Windage&Elevation; 03-29-2014 at 10:35 PM.

  2. #2
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    Wow, that's really, really nice. Neat little history of the rifle too. As a side note, if I were you, I would not disassemble it. Just leave her alone. There have been more rifles damaged due to "cleaning" and just wanting to see what's inside, than I could ever want to count. Just not worth it. One slip of the screwdriver or whatever you use, and it could make a mess of things. You have a nice rifle, just leave it that way.

  3. #3
    Senior Member tsmgguy's Avatar
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    Nice piece! Glad that it's remained in the family.
    Wanted: K98 Dou-42 bolt 5235b, and Port. bayonet G19383

  4. #4
    Hey Buddy, is that an E/4 in your pocket?
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    Welcome to the club. I like your forum name, I was a rifle range coach in the Marine Corps and used that term often. Beautiful rifle, I had one in the late "T" block and the rough finish is intriguing on them. Mine had a very, very rough dark walnut stock. Your family has inherited a very well made rifle reguardless of the stories of slave labor/quality issues.

    mow.

  5. #5
    Senior Member bjarne's Avatar
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    Default Very nice rifle

    More pictures?
    98K Collector

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    Senior Member Eh jbmauser's Avatar
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    That is a fantastic K98k and a wonderful story with it as well. Nice to see it will be staying in the family as well.
    WTB: Rough milled, blued, unnumbered floor plate as found on late MO rifles. Unnumbered MO bands, both KM and standard type, MO KM stocks including an unaccepted one, MO bands and stock 5897, upper band 0643

  7. #7
    Junior Member Windage&Elevation's Avatar
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    Default Moore Kriegsmodell Photos

    QUOTE=bjarne;81902]More pictures?[/QUOTE]

    Here are a few more photos of my Grandad's Kriegsmodell, although I'm sure he had never heard of that term; it was always a "Mauser" to all of us. I started researching the rifle last August and learned what I thought was a considerable amount. That is, until I found this board and others. I've learned more in the past two weeks than my family had learned in nearly seventy years, thanks to the members' extensive knowledge.

    You'll note the zinc replacement screws in the hand guard bands. I was extremely fortunate to find someone on one of the boards who happened to have two replacement screws for sale. They should arrive in a few days. The other non-correct item is that the front sight hood is missing (I assume that one was issued with the rifle). At least those are the only non-correct items I know of.

    IMG_20140317_095125_285.jpgIMG_20140317_095240_587.jpgIMG_20140317_095455_187.jpg
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    Last edited by Windage&Elevation; 03-22-2014 at 07:25 PM.

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    Junior Member Windage&Elevation's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mowzerluvr View Post
    Welcome to the club. I like your forum name, I was a rifle range coach in the Marine Corps and used that term often. Beautiful rifle, I had one in the late "T" block and the rough finish is intriguing on them. Mine had a very, very rough dark walnut stock. Your family has inherited a very well made rifle reguardless of the stories of slave labor/quality issues.

    mow.
    Mowzerluvr,

    Thanks, and I'm sure the first time I heard "windage and elevation" was on a Marine Corps range early in my naval career. The trips I made to USMC ranges were always very instructive, and always a lot of fun. Who better to instruct marksmanship? Being a rifle range coach must have been a fun and rewarding job.

    You may be interested to learn that my last encounter with a Marine gunnery sergeant was at the NAS Jacksonville BOQ some years ago. I'd just walked into the lobby, arms full of pubs and papers, and joined a group of NROTC midshipmen buying Cokes from a vending machine. Since both hands were full, I hadn't removed my khaki cover yet. Suddenly, from behind me exploded the unmistakable thunderbolt voice of Marine drill instructor, who unleashed a ten second stream of R. Lee Ermy-worthy invectives directed at the back of my head. The midshipmen, who could see my gold oak leaves, stood frozen with eyes and mouths wide open -- almost as wide open as my own. I'm sure I sucked my head halfway into my shoulders as well. When I turned around to face their DI, he spied my rank and quickly joined our open mouthed club. So there we all stood in open mouthed stunned silence, till the gunnery sergeant leaned forward and said quietly in my ear, "I'm sorry commander, I didn't see your rank." To which I answered loud enough for the midshipmen to hear, "No Gunney, it's my fault, I shouldn't be covered indoors." I figured the middies would be more impressed by their drill sergeant's authority being reinforced than by some indignant lieutenant commander dressing down a Marine gunnery sergeant. I hope the gunnery sergeant got as big a laugh out of it later on as I did.

    Us USN types always like to kid the Marines, and vice versa. But I always found that there was a lot of mutual respect whenever we worked together.
    Last edited by Windage&Elevation; 03-22-2014 at 09:37 PM.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Rook16's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbmauser View Post
    That is a fantastic K98k and a wonderful story with it as well. Nice to see it will be staying in the family as well.
    Ditto from me as well. Thanks for sharing; and also really enjoyed your story to Mowzerluvr re: the encounter with the gunny.

  10. #10
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    Once you get the original screws that should do it. Don't even worry about the front sight hood not being there. I'd leave it "as is" without the sight hood 'cause it may not have had one. Some didn't. So, that's not "non-original" to not have a sight hood. Hope the zinc screws didn't mess up the wood to where you can't get the original screws in due to zinc ones making the hole larger.

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