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Thread: 1943 german k98 mauser byf

  1. #21
    Senior Member tsmgguy's Avatar
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    Repair, refinishing, and restoration often just open their own can of worms. There's a great story in the rifle as it is now. Why not consider leaving it as it is and acquiring a nicer matching rifle if that's what you really want? You would likely never really be satisfied with the results of any restoration/repair work.

    I'm no expert on Canadian WWII field gear, but the stock basically got cut in half to fit a container far shorter than a duffle bag, and indeed shorter than the barreled action.

    Your father probably did both the cut and later the repair when he was back in Canada after the war, adding a chapter to the rifle's history. That cut can never be invisibly repaired. To try to repair the cut might just be heaping on more damage since whoever does the repair is not going to work only in the damaged area; he's going to want to refinish the whole stock. Then, the metal would likely follow, and the rifle's originality is then gone forever.
    Wanted: K98 Dou-42 bolt 5235b, and Port. bayonet G19383

  2. #22
    Junior Member shaunman79's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tsmgguy View Post
    Repair, refinishing, and restoration often just open their own can of worms. There's a great story in the rifle as it is now. Why not consider leaving it as it is and acquiring a nicer matching rifle if that's what you really want? You would likely never really be satisfied with the results of any restoration/repair work.

    I'm no expert on Canadian WWII field gear, but the stock basically got cut in half to fit a container far shorter than a duffle bag, and indeed shorter than the barreled action.

    Your father probably did both the cut and later the repair when he was back in Canada after the war, adding a chapter to the rifle's history. That cut can never be invisibly repaired. To try to repair the cut might just be heaping on more damage since whoever does the repair is not going to work only in the damaged area; he's going to want to refinish the whole stock. Then, the metal would likely follow, and the rifle's originality is then gone forever.
    I have no plans on doing any restoration on this rifle I agree with you leave it as it is!.

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