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Thread: CCC Soldbuch of a Stalingrad and Westernfront '44/'45 veteran

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    Moderator Peter U's Avatar
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    Default CCC Soldbuch of a Stalingrad and Westernfront '44/'45 veteran

    Hi guys,


    This document set is new in my collection.
    The Soldbuch itself is totally worn out; in 1944 even the cover was replaced.
    Lucky forus collectors they didn’t issued him a new one; after the war the veteran triedto conserve his Soldbuch alas he did it with sticky tape and plastic foil, the damage isn’t to big and these type of Soldbucher aren’t that common at all so Idon’t have any problems with the post war repairs.

    Wilhelm Heinz (°1922) was called up to serve in 1941; he got his basic training from 2.Inf Ers Btl 49, after finishing his training he was assigned to Marschkompanie Inf Ers Btl 425 for further training.
    He arrived on the eastern front in Charkov on May 8 1942 with the 2nd companyof IR535 of the 384ID.
    On July 4 1942 he was hit by shrapnel in his right hand and upper arm, for this wound hegot the wounded badge in black and a small vacation.
    On August 14 1942 he is back with his unit, they now are a part of the 6th Army and the advance on Stalingrad.
    He willfight until they get 15Km from the city centre, in this period he earns his Infantry Sturmabzeichen (Sep 12 1942); on September 13 1942 he his sent back to Germany to follow an officers course.
    So he was one of the lucky once that got out of Stalingrad before it was encircled, his comrades weren’t so lucky, their division was completely destroyed in the Stalingrad pocket.
    After successfully completing his officer’s course, he is assigned as a lieutenant to the firstcompany of Füselier Batallion 336, a recon unit that is created in February 1944 for the 336ID which is then fighting in the Crimea.
    Pretty soon he is wounded again, on February 5 1944 he gets phosphor burns on his right handand left leg, he stays in hospital for six weeks and when he is home on vacation he has to get an operation to have his tonsils removed.
    When he is recovered from all this he is transferred to the newly created Füselier Btl 256,the recon unit of the 256 Volksgrenadier Division in September 1944.
    At the start of October ’44 they are transferred from Köningsbrück to North Holland atthe end of this month they are moved to the frontline in Southern Holland.
    On October 23 1944 the allies start operation “Colin” an attempt to liberate the areaSouth of the Meuse West of the corridor that was created by the airborne operation “Market-Garden”; initially the offensive is a success but after a fewdays the advance of the 51st Highland Division with his 7thArmored Brigade is halted on the road from Tilburg to ‘s Hertogenbosch, this is the sector of the 256VGD. They will be fierce fighting for several days on the moor of Loon op Zand, it is here that W.Heinz gets his first five close combat days.
    Eventually after a lot of casualties the allies will liberate the Southern banc of the Meuse river, the 256VGD will hold the frontline for a while between the Meuse and Waal rivers but in early November ’44 they are transferred to the Alsace to hold theallied advance.
    In early December they fight against the 75th US Army Division for control over Haguenau; the fighting is fierce, he will get ten close combat days in this period.
    He now has 15 close combat days and gets the close combat clasp in bronze, an EKI & IIand is promoted to Oberleutenant.
    On March 15 1945 he gets wounded for a third time, he gets a bullet through his left upperarm, now he gets a wounded badge in silver.
    After the capitulation of the German army he will cooperate with the XX US Army Corps ofthe 3th US army.


    I hope you guys like the images,
    Peter


    PS: he had a private purchase Sauer pistol.
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    Moderator Peter U's Avatar
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    Senior Member AndyB's Avatar
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    Interesting is probably by the weapons as he got a polish Wz.22 bayonet probably in late 1942.

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    No War Eagles For You! mrfarb's Avatar
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    Great soldbuch Peter- I like the ones with history, and this guy was a fighter!
    Order the new K98k book at www.thirdpartypress.com
    Don't forget to visit www.latewar.com for info on late war 98k's.

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    Peter,

    Thanks for sharing. Outstanding soldbuch.

    Mike

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    Moderator Peter U's Avatar
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    Hello mfarb,

    I knew you would like it ;-)
    I to love these worn out examples full of history; I like all veteran stories but WW2 German Soldbucher contain a treasury of information an amateur historian can relatively easy read and interpret, specially if you compare them to their allied counterparts.
    Soldbucher contain so much information that allied intelligence units must have had an easy job reading the Soldbucher of captured German soldiers.

    All in all Wilhelm Heinz only spend +/- 6 months on the frontline in the almost five years he was in the army during the war, but in that time he saw action in some very famous and very dangerous parts of the frontline and in that relatively shorttime he was wounded three times and got awarded with the Infantrie Sturmabzeichen, wound badges, close combat clasp and EKII & I.
    What I also like are Soldbucher of what are considered basicly non combatants which have won bravery awards during their time in the army.


    Cheers,
    Peter

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    Community Organizer Hambone's Avatar
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    Great stuff Peter. Pic stickied for ref.

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    Junior Member Hessian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter U View Post
    Hello mfarb,

    I knew you would like it ;-)
    I to love these worn out examples full of history; I like all veteran stories but WW2 German Soldbucher contain a treasury of information an amateur historian can relatively easy read and interpret, specially if you compare them to their allied counterparts.
    Soldbucher contain so much information that allied intelligence units must have had an easy job reading the Soldbucher of captured German soldiers.

    All in all Wilhelm Heinz only spend +/- 6 months on the frontline in the almost five years he was in the army during the war, but in that time he saw action in some very famous and very dangerous parts of the frontline and in that relatively shorttime he was wounded three times and got awarded with the Infantrie Sturmabzeichen, wound badges, close combat clasp and EKII & I.
    What I also like are Soldbucher of what are considered basicly non combatants which have won bravery awards during their time in the army.


    Cheers,
    Peter
    Peter,

    I have a stack of these soldbuch that I picked up many, many years ago a few are stuffed with extra papers and pictures. I'm new to the forum, would you be interested in seeing them?

    Regards,
    Robert

  10. #10
    "Ach du lieber!" Bigdibbs88's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter U View Post
    In early December they fight against the 75th US Army Division for control over Haguenau; the fighting is fierce, he will get ten close combat days in this period.
    Peter-

    this is a cool sodbuch....would be amazing to hear his account of the advance on stalingrad. Question though- did you mean the 79th division? I dont think the 75th was near there.

    Rob

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