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Thread: Never finished bnz 45?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Bob in OHIO's Avatar
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    Default Never finished bnz 45?

    This one came to me w/o one action screw and the end cap apparently was never placed on the stock which has a pilot hole but a screw was never added. Further, the band screws appear phosphated... but weirdly shape. This one might have been sitting at Steyr when GIs occupied?

    I love the sparklie phosphate on the trigger guard, the sloppy solderwork, and the crude woodworking with a stock repair.
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    Last edited by Bob in OHIO; 03-20-2010 at 02:30 PM.

    email => K98@bobinohio.com

  2. #2
    Is that a scope you have in your pocket?
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    Bob
    Very Nice BNZ45 love that sloopy workmanship . Makes me want to start Collecting 45 dated 98`s again
    But can not Do both 45 and Snipers and stay true to my first Love , Again Awesome BNZ 45
    Last edited by Dave Roberts; 10-24-2018 at 11:19 PM.

  3. #3
    Super Over the Top Moderator -1/2 bruce98k's Avatar
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    Default bnz45

    Gotta love those walnut T blocks - about as varied as it gets at the end. Great example Bob.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Bob in OHIO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob in OHIO View Post
    This one might have been sitting at Steyr when GIs occupied?
    Okay, bringing this post back after 8+ years... and will suggest this rifle most likely was liberated from inside Steyr, and here are the reasons why...

    1. The end cap was missing when purchased. There's the pilot hole but no evidence of a screw being placed
    2. No "final" on the receiver or the wood
    3. Front sight blade is NOT indexed.... Therefore, likely not test fired
    4. Cut for a hood, but one was never placed. The phosphate around the groove is perfect
    5. Safety does not work. I am quite sure it's the original.... but final hand fitting didn't happen.


    A few more pics, for good measure... and I wonder just how many of these "Nearly Finished" rifles exist?
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    email => K98@bobinohio.com

  5. #5
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    Awesome rifle Bob! My SwjXE is the same way, never had an end cap or screw installed, same with the band screw holes, they are only piloted, there are no threads cut/swaged from a screw. Of course Steyr proper is not where they would have been picked up though.

  6. #6
    RKI- Reasonably Knowledgable Individual heavy_mech's Avatar
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    Bob I have to say I agree with all your points and with the additional photos and 'evidence' I'm more convinced this never left and was picked up there when Molln was captured. Being it's nearly 1000 before the known high, why did it stay? Was it the stock repair? Obviously it was 'set aside' for a time. Great late war piece!
    "Wen Tausend einen Mann erschlagen, das ist nicht Ruhm, das ist nicht Ehre, denn beinsen wird's in späteren tagen gesiegt hat doch das Deutsch Heer. Podest nicht die Paten der Soldaten doner die da Sterben sollen, soll man geben was sie wollen, sahs sie Herzen, sahs sie Küssen, den sie wissen nicht wann sie sterben müssen"

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    There were storage facilities all over the Steyr valley, they even set up
    in a brewery for a time! We can guess late Steyr’s were likely liberated from multiple locations, whether it was at the final assembly area or a nearby storage point no one could know. Also maybe an issue of non linear production, in regards to the serial??
    The stock repair likely had no bearing on this, that is quite a common sight on bnz45’s. I would put my money on this/these stock damages occurring at a final fitting of the action after rough inletting, as this exact point is very important to the “vertical” component of inletting most actions, combine that with nature of the stock shape here and the grain direction as well as the low density walnut of these stocks etc, I could see that snapping off quite regularly!

  8. #8
    I buy capture paper guns ugafx4's Avatar
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    Default

    I have one 194 later. Same exact features. Rear band without a screw, front band one screw. No cap. I need to check the front site, but I bet it is not staked.

    http://www.k98kforum.com/showthread....BNZ-45-T-Block

  9. #9
    Senior Member Winchester Cowboy's Avatar
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    Very nice and interesting rifle!

  10. #10
    Senior Member Bob in OHIO's Avatar
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    Thanks gents for the correction to Molin... as the point of "liberation".

    Quote Originally Posted by heavy_mech View Post
    Bob I have to say I agree with all your points and with the additional photos and 'evidence' I'm more convinced this never left and was picked up there when Molln was captured. Being it's nearly 1000 before the known high, why did it stay? Was it the stock repair? Obviously it was 'set aside' for a time. Great late war piece!
    Quote Originally Posted by Loewe View Post
    The assembly was done at a small town southwest of Steyr, called Molln, closer to Steyr than Gusen. All small arms were assembled there after August 1944 or there about. A nasty problem with bomb laden aircraft forced a dispersal, at least of what could be moved. Production remained at Steyr, but aircraft related mostly (they made ball bearings and trucks there too, at least parts of trucks, engines etc.. it is unclear what wasn't moved though, they moved what they could). Any rifles taken would have been obtained in or around Molln, perhaps a depot in the area, or enroute. The US Army was the "liberator" of the areas involved, so this explains why so many bnz/45 are found here. Had rifle production remained at Steyr, this would not have been the case.

    email => K98@bobinohio.com

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