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Thread: Identification help!

  1. #21
    Moderator² Loewe's Avatar
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    This confirms what we knew already, its the original stock, or one that perfectly fits, which is practically an impossibility.

    Glad you have a handle on disassembly, some experienced collectors make mistakes and they are easy to make if its not been apart for decades. Once you get it apart, confirm the internal serial, it would be interesting if the error was carried over inside. Also, check out the barrel code, it will be under the barrel, near the barrel shoulder (near the receiver), it should have a fireproof, three acceptance stamps and an barrel code, probably "BS" followed by a number, in this range high 600's or low 700's are consistent, but it can range widely. Probably low 700's for this serial range. Again Mauser is very consistent in all things, even during the war, but variations do exist.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loewe View Post
    This confirms what we knew already, its the original stock, or one that perfectly fits, which is practically an impossibility.

    Glad you have a handle on disassembly, some experienced collectors make mistakes and they are easy to make if its not been apart for decades. Once you get it apart, confirm the internal serial, it would be interesting if the error was carried over inside. Also, check out the barrel code, it will be under the barrel, near the barrel shoulder (near the receiver), it should have a fireproof, three acceptance stamps and an barrel code, probably "BS" followed by a number, in this range high 600's or low 700's are consistent, but it can range widely. Probably low 700's for this serial range. Again Mauser is very consistent in all things, even during the war, but variations do exist.

    Well I have cool news. I let the gun sit with a little penetrating oil on that screw for a day. I actually used my impact with the correct bit. I taped the throttle once and saw the screw move. I then was able to get it out with a screw driver! Once I removed the barrel I could not see any markings on the inside of the stock. I started wiping old residue away and there it was. The number on the inside of the stock is 8320! So that means whoever stamped this gun screwed up on the stamp on the stock!!!! This really cool to me, adds a little more character to the gun.
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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scooter24 View Post
    Well I have cool news. I let the gun sit with a little penetrating oil on that screw for a day. I actually used my impact with the correct bit. I taped the throttle once and saw the screw move. I then was able to get it out with a screw driver! Once I removed the barrel I could not see any markings on the inside of the stock. I started wiping old residue away and there it was. The number on the inside of the stock is 8320! So that means whoever stamped this gun screwed up on the stamp on the stock!!!! This really cool to me, adds a little more character to the gun.
    Couple more pics of the barrel stamps.
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  4. #24
    Moderator² Loewe's Avatar
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    Your experience paid off, I am glad to took your time and did it expertly!

    More than being cool, this actually helps value, - doubt, even the slightest, can considerably lessen a rifles value, so that the error wasn't carried over inside pretty much eliminates the slightest doubt that this wasn't the original stock.... It is also the first example i have seen showing such an error on the part of Mauser, which along with DWM is generally considered the best makers. They just didn't make this sort of mistake often, at least without a correction (counterstruck). This rifle has a lot going for it, wouldn't be difficult to sell if the price was reasonably set.

    Thanks for the barrel code, very helpful!

    Quote Originally Posted by Scooter24 View Post
    Well I have cool news. I let the gun sit with a little penetrating oil on that screw for a day. I actually used my impact with the correct bit. I taped the throttle once and saw the screw move. I then was able to get it out with a screw driver! Once I removed the barrel I could not see any markings on the inside of the stock. I started wiping old residue away and there it was. The number on the inside of the stock is 8320! So that means whoever stamped this gun screwed up on the stamp on the stock!!!! This really cool to me, adds a little more character to the gun.

  5. #25
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    That's the first I seen and like Paul stated an error from this manufacturer is pretty abnormal. They were probably one of the finest makers of these great rifles and seeing an error from them is pretty cool to say the least. I also appreciate the effort you went to remove the action from the stock and show the barrel code very helpful and thank you.
    "Don't use your musket if you can kill 'em with your hatchet"

    Major Robert Rogers 1757 Founder of the U.S Army Rangers

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