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Thread: Identification help!

  1. #1
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    Default Identification help!

    Hi I'm new here and this is my first post hope it's in the correct spot. First off my name is scooter and I love war relics and anything war related. I love old military rifles, the stories they could tell if they could talk is what draws me to them. I've always loved mausers but never really dug deep into he history of them. So forgive me as I'm still learning about them. As for why I'm here, I bought a geweher 98 or a k98 from my local gun store. They labeled it as a k98 but I'm not so sure because of the year. The receiver has 1916 stamped on the reciever. It was said to be all matching numbers. Numbers are 8320. It is missing the cleaning rod so that sucks and the bayonet that it come with doesnt have anything on it as far as a serial number. My main question what is this exaclty? Did the cleaning rod have the serial number? Also was the stock stamped with a serial number? Another main question I have is this stock has a number stamped or etched into it and that number is 8230. So that number doesnt match the rest. When I look at the serial number on the stock it looks a little funny so I'm not sure if its origional or if someone added it later and accidentally flipped the 3 and 2. Any advice would be awsome, thanks.
    Also I forgot to add this rifle is rough but does cycle and function. Doesnt look like it has ever been refinished wich I like. Also bear with me while I try and find a way to attach photos. Everytime i do It says they are too big or they wont let me attach them all.
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    Last edited by Scooter24; 02-02-2019 at 08:39 PM.

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    The rest of the photos, wish it would let me attach them to the origional post.
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    Senior Member ebeeby's Avatar
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    From what I can see, you did fine with this Gewehr 98. Need photos of the bolt and bolt parts.
    Don't sweat the reversed numbers on the stock - not an unheard of thing with these rifles.
    Should be easy-ish to find a cleaning rod numbered 20.
    How's the bore and crown look?

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    ax - hole Warrior1354's Avatar
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    Looks like a nice honest Mauser made Gew98 rifle. Would like to see pictures of the bolt when you get time. And neat S98/05 bayonet as well. It was once a Sawback bayonet but it was later removed due to regulations that was put in place around 1917. The Germans did this to counteract the propaganda campaign, and relating threats to the general welfare of their troops. The British and French threaten the Imperial German government that any German soldier captured with a Sawback bayonet would be killed.

    In reality the Sawback bayonet was made not to cause more damage to an enemy soldier but to cut light timber and brush by engineers building fortifications.
    "Don't use your musket if you can kill 'em with your hatchet"

    Major Robert Rogers 1757 Founder of the U.S Army Rangers

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    Quote Originally Posted by ebeeby View Post
    From what I can see, you did fine with this Gewehr 98. Need photos of the bolt and bolt parts.
    Don't sweat the reversed numbers on the stock - not an unheard of thing with these rifles.
    Should be easy-ish to find a cleaning rod numbered 20.
    How's the bore and crown look?
    As far as the bore goes, it's very dirty. The store labeled it as poor. I'm going to run a cleaning rod though it and see how it comes out. As far as the stock number is this not ththe origional stock or did the person that stamped it screw up? It would be one hell of a coincidence to find a stock to almost match the serial numbers jlbut just have the 2 and 3 flipped.
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    ax - hole Warrior1354's Avatar
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    I would say this stock is the original stock that was on the rifle when in left the factory. The way the serial numbers are off I would say that is a perfect example of a factory error. It did happen and in 1916 no less. That was a very hard year not only on weapons production but also on men and equipment.

    The Battle of the Somme and the Battle of Verdun showed that.

    And thanks for the bolt pictures as well. What I like about this rifle is that the piece is untouched doesn't look like it has been messed with, which is a good thing. Cleaning wise take it slow and have lots of patience. Remember it is a 103 years young!
    "Don't use your musket if you can kill 'em with your hatchet"

    Major Robert Rogers 1757 Founder of the U.S Army Rangers

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    Quote Originally Posted by Warrior1354 View Post
    I would say this stock is the original stock that was on the rifle when in left the factory. The way the serial numbers are off I would say that is a perfect example of a factory error. It did happen and in 1916 no less. That was a very hard year not only on weapons production but also on men and equipment.

    The Battle of the Somme and the Battle of Verdun showed that.

    And thanks for the bolt pictures as well. What I like about this rifle is that the piece is untouched doesn't look like it has been messed with, which is a good thing. Cleaning wise take it slow and have lots of patience. Remember it is a 103 years young!
    Yeah they way it was off made me think it was just a accident. And this makes me feel better, just wish the cleaning rod was with it. Would the rod have the full serial number or just "20"? So this rilfe isnt considered a k98? Also I paid $449 for it how bad of a price do you think this was? I though it was ok since it didnt look like the rifle was ever refinished.

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    Senior Member mauser1908's Avatar
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    I agree, I like it a lot. While a factory error is not the most 'ideal' thing for everyone, I think it's neat. For some reason Gustloff bolts stick out in my mind for common numbering errors. Features on the stock look good too for block. Nice righteous gun, reminds me of the ff block I used to have. I think the error on a WMO rifle is interesting, something I would expect from Danzig or Erfurt but not WMO. You stole it at the price you paid.

    Quote Originally Posted by Warrior1354 View Post
    I would say this stock is the original stock that was on the rifle when in left the factory. The way the serial numbers are off I would say that is a perfect example of a factory error. It did happen and in 1916 no less. That was a very hard year not only on weapons production but also on men and equipment.

    The Battle of the Somme and the Battle of Verdun showed that.

    And thanks for the bolt pictures as well. What I like about this rifle is that the piece is untouched doesn't look like it has been messed with, which is a good thing. Cleaning wise take it slow and have lots of patience. Remember it is a 103 years young!

  9. #9
    ax - hole Warrior1354's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scooter24 View Post
    Yeah they way it was off made me think it was just a accident. And this makes me feel better, just wish the cleaning rod was with it. Would the rod have the full serial number or just "20"? So this rilfe isnt considered a k98? Also I paid $449 for it how bad of a price do you think this was? I though it was ok since it didnt look like the rifle was ever refinished.
    Yes the correct Imperial Era cleaning rod for this rifle would be numbered #20 and would be marked with an Imperial stamp as well. And no this rifle is not a K98k. The K98k was a carbine that was adopted by the German military in the 1930s and was their main service rifle of WWII.

    The Gew 98 or Gewehr for rifle in German was adopted by the Imperial German military to replace the Gew 88 rifles as their main rifle used by the Infantry. Military tactics at the time was hit the enemy from long range and then charged across the battlefield and finish the enemy off with bayonets. Great idea for the academies and warfare used during the Napoleon era not so much in trench warfare where the Maxim machine gun made that concept of warfare all but useless.

    The other German weapon of choice would have been the Kar98a carbine but that was used more by Artillery men, Linemen, equipment personal, and Sturmtruppen

    The Sturmtruppen preferred this weapons because of its shorter length made it much handy in the trenches and more mobile to use this weapon. The lessons of WW1 due to the changes of warfare would later influence the adopted of a new service rifle for the German military by 1934.

    And $499 is a damn good price. A bolt mismatched Gew98 would start at $800.
    Last edited by Warrior1354; 02-02-2019 at 09:58 PM.
    "Don't use your musket if you can kill 'em with your hatchet"

    Major Robert Rogers 1757 Founder of the U.S Army Rangers

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    Quote Originally Posted by Warrior1354 View Post
    Yes the correct Imperial Era cleaning rod for this rifle would be numbered #20 and would be marked with an Imperial stamp as well. And no this rifle is not a K98k. The K98k was a carbine that was adopted by the German military in the 1930s and was their main service rifle of WWII.

    The Gew 98 or Gewehr for rifle in German was adopted by the Imperial German military to replace the Gew 88 rifles as their main rifle used by the Infantry. Military tactics at the time was hit the enemy from long range and then charged across the battlefield and finish the enemy off with bayonets. Great idea for the academies and warfare used during the Napoleon era not so much in trench warfare where the Maxim machine gun made that concept of warfare all but useless.

    The other German weapon of choice would have been the Kar98a carbine but that was used more by Artillery men, Linemen, equipment personal, and Sturmtruppen

    The Sturmtruppen preferred this weapons because of its shorter length made it much handy in the trenches and more mobile to use this weapon.

    And $499 is a damn good price. A bolt mismatched rifle like would start at $800.
    Ok what I thought, thank you guys for quick responses. I have a lot to learn about this rilfe and mausers in general. I also just picked up a beautiful 1891 Argentine mauser made in 1899 all matching except cleaning rod. As far as the bolt take down area on the stock, I thought that was only on the k98?

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