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Thread: Interesing WW1 German pictures.

  1. #11
    ax - hole Warrior1354's Avatar
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    Hey at least were getting somewhere and thanks for taking the time and effort with this Mike. You really do surprise me how much you know about artillery and ordnance.

    By the way I will be posting a few more pictures as well. Some in the K98k section too.
    "Don't use your musket if you can kill 'em with your hatchet"

    Major Robert Rogers 1757 Founder of the U.S Army Rangers

  2. #12
    Senior Member mauser1908's Avatar
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    I love the weapon's maintenance photos. I think #2 is either just after the turn of the century or possibly Bavarian based on the tunics.

  3. #13
    ax - hole Warrior1354's Avatar
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    Some more pictures to add to this thread

    1. Jager troops learning marksmanship on the Gew98 rifle really like this one

    2. Another squad picture of a group of young German soldiers with their Gew98 rifles
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    "Don't use your musket if you can kill 'em with your hatchet"

    Major Robert Rogers 1757 Founder of the U.S Army Rangers

  4. #14
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    Default Interesting German Photos

    How our Gews got mismatched bolts!
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  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Noll View Post
    How our Gews got mismatched bolts!
    I enjoy your very much 'tongue in cheek' comment, however also likely true! Most soldiers/armorers were probably not anal-types concerned about "all-matching" firearms! Leave that to certain collectors. Just think, some of the guys in this photo are probably responsible for 'forced-matching' workmanship we see on the auctions and board sales.

  6. #16
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    Interesting that they wear their neck cloths even without their tunics. I assume the vests were private purchase additions, although they seem uniform in color.

  7. #17
    Senior Member feldmütze's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Montana7184 View Post
    I enjoy your very much 'tongue in cheek' comment, however also likely true! Most soldiers/armorers were probably not anal-types concerned about "all-matching" firearms! Leave that to certain collectors. Just think, some of the guys in this photo are probably responsible for 'forced-matching' workmanship we see on the auctions and board sales.
    In reality, probably not. Swapping bolts gets us into potential headspace issues, & that's something they would choose to avoid, just as we would now...
    "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.
    Only the dead have seen the end of war"

    George Santayana

  8. #18
    Moderator² Loewe's Avatar
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    Try taking a dozen bolts and intermingling the parts, only then will you realize the parts were serialed because of Montana's observation regarding human nature, - sure soldiers are young men and cleaning their rifles and equipment were a chore, not a pleasurable pursuit, but that is why "generally" you see someone in charge at group cleanings and the men with their components neatly in front of them on a cloth.. rare is a group cleaning can, though typically a small can of cleaner or grease (I assume).

    You can not compare a group cleaning of bolt action rifles by young soldiers 100 years ago, before interchangeability of parts were perfected, with Marines and soldiers today cleaning their M16's. I understand human nature because I was one of those 18-23 year old's who group cleaned M16's after the rifle range and the last thing I wanted to do was clean the rifle (I wanted the knucklehead at the armory to take the damn thing back so I could beat the crowd at the chow hall), however the circumstances are not the same, my M16 wasn't serialed down to the individual components and if I swapped parts with Louis Santiago's M16 it would still work, but if Sgt Steiner swapped internal bolt parts with Private Kruger's G98 they very well could be issues...

    Do these guys look like they would swap parts? (Munich 1916)

    Quote Originally Posted by feldmütze View Post
    In reality, probably not. Swapping bolts gets us into potential headspace issues, & that's something they would choose to avoid, just as we would now...
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  9. #19
    Moderator² Loewe's Avatar
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    Saxony 1916, better view of the can, looks like a cut open grease can, hard to say..
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  10. #20
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    Likely Waffenfett16
    See: http://www.k98kforum.com/showthread....rewdrivers-ect

    #2, photos 1, 4, 5

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