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Thread: Commercial Mauser Oberndorf rifle from 1908

  1. #11
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    Mr. Speed will certainly know better than I.

    172/28 is a gauge marking, for .300. A (156/14) .310 would not fit. The 2.7g GBP is the powder charge, and S.t.m.G is a steel jacketed bullet.

    However it is interesting that they have later style (I would expect to see post WWII) measurement of the bore/groove diameters.

    7,65 is the bore, 7,9 is the groove.

    If you notice on the side, it is also marked 7,7mm which is again an even later style of marking. Again, common with 8mm's.

    None of that specifies the case length. Which given the different powder charge for proofing, I would double check just to be sure.

    I learned long ago to slug and chamber cast my German commercial rifles. They vary GREATLY. I just started working up loads for a Wehrmannsgewehr I recently purchased. Slugging the bore I got .305"/.315". Typically I find that most German rifles are TIGHT compared to US Standards. Some target shooters prefer that.

  2. #12
    Super Over the Top Moderator -1/2 bruce98k's Avatar
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    Default More info from Jon

    Bruce, to add to guys talk on 1908 Mauser here is image from my first Sporter history book in ammo section a Mauser Firm Chart that shows the Turk and Argentine 7.65 cartridge Bore data as found under barrels as 7.65-7.9 as bore-groove and 250 as Twsit rarte. The number 172,28 is the actual industry Bore guage used to check these dimensions etc. The rifle in question has this exact data so no questions on caliber. I must say this is one of the nicest examples I have ever seen for an Army Hunitng rifle as designated in German catalogs and in Englsih catalogs as Type C. Regards, Jon

    Jon also attached the factory document segment:
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    ---- Turbo Myš ----

  3. #13
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    Jon, the information you provide is excellent and outstanding. If you wish to have better pictures of this rifle for whatever way you may be able to use them (I can also do very high resolution pictures with a neutral white background in publishable quality) you can have them. I'd just need an e-mail address where to send those to. And if anyone here wants them, I can also do a few for the forum - just let me know.
    Not being much of an expert on the civilian Mauser sporting rifles plus not being a native English speaker I need to ask, is there any difference between 7,65 Argentine and 7,65 Turkish? I've never heard of the 7,65 Turkish before either.

  4. #14
    Super Over the Top Moderator -1/2 bruce98k's Avatar
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    Default Caliber designation

    Answer to his question the first 7.65 round was created by Paul Mauser for his Belgium 89 rifle then Turk Model 90 and Model 93 up through 1897. Then later in Turk 1903 and 1908 carbines. In 1891 Argentina made rifle orders through the Leewe group who made Argentine model 91 rifles in caliber 7.65 and later in 1933-37 Argentine Mauser made carbines all in 7.65 thats why the Designation for rounds for Turk and Argentina in charts which only had different bullet types from 89-1937 etc. Regards, Jon.

    
    ---- Turbo Myš ----

  5. #15
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    Since I've did a picture set for Jon please find attached the "low resolution" versions (only 2400 px width).
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  6. #16
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    Second part of low resolution picture set.
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