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Thread: Karabiner 98b

  1. #1
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    Default Karabiner 98b

    Hello

    Found in northern France,

    1st assignment to 13 Reiter Regiment (Hanover) and then ????

    The bayonet was found in the same farm 30 years ago, the farmer had lost the scabbard

    My friend had found an 2nd 98b in another farm 3km away

    The day he sold me this one, we drank several good beers but he did not give up the bayonet

    I do not despair

    Best regard
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    Moderator² Loewe's Avatar
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    The merits of beer are endless... especially good beer, very possibly man's greatest invention.

    Pretty nice example, tough block to find them nice also, - do you have a picture of the right side of the buttstock? Probably Eagle/46 or 43, but it would be good to know.

  3. #3
    ax - hole Warrior1354's Avatar
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    A fantastic example. Not to mention a dream gun for us Simson collectors here in the United States to find in original condition like this, and untouched.

    And I don't know about that Paul a wise man told me it was God that gave man the recipe to make beer. He basically said man was too stupid. We would have spent more time trying to make a design to pour it out of or trying to find a name for it!

    So I don't know that guy was pretty smart he lived to be a 101. I unloaded hay for him and drink beer with him after I put his hay in his barn for him.

    Would love to see more pictures of this fine rifle Jack when you get time. But thank you for posting the pictures provided so far, really fantastic piece.
    "Don't use your musket if you can kill 'em with your hatchet"

    Major Robert Rogers 1757 Founder of the U.S Army Rangers

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    Thank you for your answers, unfortunately it is not untouched, it is desactived by a pin.

    There is no parasitic stamp

    Eagle 43 on the right side of the buuttstock

    Some small pieces are mismacht, triggerguard screws, ejector box, extractor
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    Last edited by JACKDANIELS; 04-13-2019 at 01:52 PM.

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    Default

    more pictures
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    Moderator² Loewe's Avatar
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    A rifle like this is rare in the US, pretty original, more than most, especially this early. The dated (1925) are more common that most of the earliest blocks (a-c), the 1924's and 1926's are all rare in any condition, and the d-f blocks are most common in upper grades. Your rifle being early and very nice would make it desirable over here, I am sure its rare for Western Europe also, though I do not know markets there. Maybe in France it's not too desirable...

    Anyway, thanks for the excellent photographs, even the rearsight base looks original, many aren't, they often were replace later in the nazis era. Looks like the scale and slide were replaced but period done. Kar.98b's generally do not get much more original! A good looker!

  7. #7
    Moderator² Loewe's Avatar
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    Probably some truth in that, - the Lord gave us the recipe for beer to keep us from killing one another... I am sure beer has prevented more than one war over the course of history.

    Quote Originally Posted by Warrior1354 View Post
    And I don't know about that Paul a wise man told me it was God that gave man the recipe to make beer. He basically said man was too stupid. We would have spent more time trying to make a design to pour it out of or trying to find a name for it!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loewe View Post
    A rifle like this is rare in the US, pretty original, more than most, especially this early. The dated (1925) are more common that most of the earliest blocks (a-c), the 1924's and 1926's are all rare in any condition, and the d-f blocks are most common in upper grades. Your rifle being early and very nice would make it desirable over here, I am sure its rare for Western Europe also, though I do not know markets there. Maybe in France it's not too desirable...

    Anyway, thanks for the excellent photographs, even the rearsight base looks original, many aren't, they often were replace later in the nazis era. Looks like the scale and slide were replaced but period done. Kar.98b's generally do not get much more original! A good looker!
    Thank you for these explanations

    What does this number 77? recovery part or manufacturer's mark mean http://www.k98kforum.com/showthread....-Simson-photos

    Does the markings on the lacrosse testify to a passage in rework or depot

    Best regard
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    Moderator² Loewe's Avatar
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    I am not sure what is meant by "lacrosse"? The "77" on the rearsight component, the slide or range selector, I am sure the Germans have some 30 letter word for it, looks like a unintentional double strike, the scale and slide are period replacements, probably done at an ordnance shop, typically when such inconsequential parts are replaced, they are serialed with last 2 or sometimes the last three digits, sometimes unserialed, mostly depending on the ordnance facility doing the work (level or size, period and or circumstance... early in the war better work was done, except during busy periods, like after the Czechs surrendered and all the small arms were rushed out of the country before they changed their minds, - apparently the ordnance shops were just dumped with this material and it created chaos, which is why when Poland was taken their weapons were just piled up under guard and left to rot... then later in the war the Germans combed the ordnance depots for every warm body to fill the ranks, causing more problems, which typically are solved by expedience and shortcuts)

    As for the markings at the wrist, they are too indistinct to derive meaning from them, they could be depot related, probably are, but they form no character I can associate with a particular ordnance facility. What makes your rifle valuable (its early and largely unaltered state) also makes it difficult to attach a story to its past, at least its national socialist past, the only parts that appear replaced are two rearsight components, the least relevant parts (common parts that could be applied 1936-1945 at any level), and the ejector box, or at least the spring.

    The rifle is a fine example of an early 98b, hard to find in this condition over here, but because this rifle saw no serious ordnance work, it probably didn't go through a larger ordnance shop. It was also an obsolete variation that wouldn't have seen front line service by 1940, so that probably explains why it survived in this condition. typically old G98's and 98b's that went through the shops often were scrapped for parts or built into 98k.

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    Thank you for your answer and especially for your expertise

    see you soon for other G98 ... 'special'

    Best regards

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