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Thread: Belgian proofed IG 71

  1. #1
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    Default Belgian proofed IG 71

    I looked up the old threads to make sure I have not posted this before. I guess I didn't.
    I have an 1871 Mauser with Belgian proof marks on the barrel, receiver and bolt parts. It was made by Steyr and was polished and the wood sanded, presumably by a Belgian surplus arms house.. The markings are intact except for the date of issuance/acceptance. It looks like the last number is "8" on those, but that's all I can read. From the Belgian proofs, it looks like this work was done after 1893. The serial numbers are matching on all but the rear sight and the screws.
    How common are these? I don't see much information about them, but I am surprised that more of them have not shown up, given the size of the surplus arms dealers before the first world war who were supplying obsolete arms to any number of third world countries or just anyone who would buy them. I can supply picture if wanted.

  2. #2
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    I think they are common to a degree, but for collectors, they have little interest. Personally I find them interesting, as I just mentioned in another thread, because you can still learn from them. Few were kept in original configuration, most were shortened, made in to short rifles or carbines, some had calibers changed, the quality ranges from, frankly terrible, to extremely good quality.

    If nothing else, they make great shooters, preserving the more "collectible" ones.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fal Grunt View Post
    I think they are common to a degree, but for collectors, they have little interest. Personally I find them interesting, as I just mentioned in another thread, because you can still learn from them. Few were kept in original configuration, most were shortened, made in to short rifles or carbines, some had calibers changed, the quality ranges from, frankly terrible, to extremely good quality.

    If nothing else, they make great shooters, preserving the more "collectible" ones.
    I would consider mine original except for the Belgian proof marks. The polishing is not aggressive. It is a good shooter, and that is what it is used for. It must have spent its time in a dry climate as the bore is very good plus, no pitting. It was not apparently used as a jack handle in Ecuador like so many other sad old Mausers.

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