Third Party Press
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16

Thread: First Imperial Rifle - 1917 Erfurt Kar98a. Some Questions.

  1. #11
    Moderator≤ Loewe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    6,485

    Default

    Unit markings are rare on wartime rifles, though more common with the 98a than G98. No way to tell where it came from unless you have some idea of its past, but the Canadians would have had plenty of opportunities to encounter one.. bringing them back might have been more of a problem for a Canadian than for an American, - plus the US Army brought back 80,000 German rifles with them, late in the mid-1920's dispersed to the states (based upon the numbers of men each state contributed... I once saw a auction list from Massachusetts offering loads of this material, some states sold it others gave it to institutions, many of our rifles probably came from these dispersals, not traditional bringbacks.)

    If it passed through a depot it would be marked on the buttplate, so too a unit marking, - which is very rarely seen. Other than that, you could look at the sling, rarely they are unit marked, mostly pre-war, I use to own a nice one that had a faint unit marking near the m-buckle, artillery I believe, but again a long shot to say the least.

    In 1917 the 98a was in demand, the G98 less so, they had a glut of sorts with the G98 and depots were full of them, the 98a was taking a great importance due to doctrinal changes, which is why G98 production deminishes in 1917 and 98a increases as the war reaches it final phases. I doubt 98a's were stored as long as a G98 by 1917, though it is all guessing.

  2. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Loewe View Post
    Unit markings are rare on wartime rifles, though more common with the 98a than G98. No way to tell where it came from unless you have some idea of its past, but the Canadians would have had plenty of opportunities to encounter one.. bringing them back might have been more of a problem for a Canadian than for an American, - plus the US Army brought back 80,000 German rifles with them, late in the mid-1920's dispersed to the states (based upon the numbers of men each state contributed... I once saw a auction list from Massachusetts offering loads of this material, some states sold it others gave it to institutions, many of our rifles probably came from these dispersals, not traditional bringbacks.)

    If it passed through a depot it would be marked on the buttplate, so too a unit marking, - which is very rarely seen. Other than that, you could look at the sling, rarely they are unit marked, mostly pre-war, I use to own a nice one that had a faint unit marking near the m-buckle, artillery I believe, but again a long shot to say the least.

    In 1917 the 98a was in demand, the G98 less so, they had a glut of sorts with the G98 and depots were full of them, the 98a was taking a great importance due to doctrinal changes, which is why G98 production deminishes in 1917 and 98a increases as the war reaches it final phases. I doubt 98a's were stored as long as a G98 by 1917, though it is all guessing.
    Hi Loewe,

    Attached are better pictures of the sling. Unfortunately no stamps or marks that I can see. I will try and get it out of the stock tomorrow to see if things are totally matching. I intend to pick up a 98/05 bayonet next, though they sure aren't cheap!

    IMG_3459 - Copy.jpg IMG_3460 - Copy.jpg IMG_3461 - Copy.jpg IMG_3462 - Copy.jpg

    Thanks again for all the help

  3. #13
    Moderator≤ Loewe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    6,485

    Default

    Looks 98a to me, sometimes markings exist on the keeper, by the stud, but they rarely reveal much. Mfg markings are rare, though this is primarily because of wear and age (probably), most were probably mfg marked but are too faint or worn to see today. Republican era slings are more likely to reveal mfg markings, sometimes dates too. The sling when measured should be around 50 inches, typically 53-58 due to stretching, but I have seen them slightly under 50 inches too.

  4. #14
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    15

    Default

    Thanks for all the info

  5. #15
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    29

    Default

    Agreed. Sling looks like an original, although there were same type slings made post WWI and pre-WWII. Often they will have police markings on them, but the 98a was widely used between the wars and well into WWII. Original slings are difficult to find and worth a couple of hundred bucks alone in decent condition (when you can find them).

  6. #16
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gringo View Post
    Agreed. Sling looks like an original, although there were same type slings made post WWI and pre-WWII. Often they will have police markings on them, but the 98a was widely used between the wars and well into WWII. Original slings are difficult to find and worth a couple of hundred bucks alone in decent condition (when you can find them).
    Thanks for the info! I was intending to shoot this originally though now given the stock condition and nature of it being matched Iím going to hold off and try and find a bolt mismatch or otherwise Gew98

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •