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Thread: Why is linseed oil not a good idea?

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    Default Why is linseed oil not a good idea?

    I noticed on the wts forum that linseed oil was mentioned as a negative.
    Why?
    What is the best treatment for a nice stock?
    Thank you in advance

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    Senior Member morticianman1990's Avatar
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    I assume a pretty big reason is it stains the wood and leaves the stock in an unoriginal state

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk

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    No War Eagles For You! mrfarb's Avatar
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    The best treatment for a nice 98k stock is NOTHING, NOTHING AT ALL. If you have to put something on a 98k stock it's not nice IMO. And if it was nice before you put something on it, it's no longer nice after that. With that said, not many 98k's have untouched stocks.

    Linseed oil gets into the pores of the wood and over time it hardens, splitting the wood. I know, I did it when I was young and dumb.
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    Default linseed oil

    Yikes ,splitting wood . I will take a pass.
    I have been told that the Germans used Ballistol .
    Any know negative effects ?
    Old timers have mentioned oven cleaner for removing old grease and grime.
    And Yes I do understand leave it the hell alone.
    Just trying to sort out gun show talk.

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    Senior Member 40caliber's Avatar
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    another thing.

    if you ever get a stock that feels dry like driftwood, don't feed it.... it's not thirsty....it won't go bad.

    it's actually more desirable that way

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    EOD - bombs and bullets pzjgr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1armybrat View Post
    Yikes ,splitting wood . I will take a pass.
    I have been told that the Germans used Ballistol .
    Any know negative effects ?
    Old timers have mentioned oven cleaner for removing old grease and grime.
    And Yes I do understand leave it the hell alone.
    Just trying to sort out gun show talk.
    Ballistol long term is probably not really good either...plus Germans were said to have used anything available, including motor oil.

    I don't think, at the time, they weren't worried about long term effects...

    The less you do the better, as you seem to understand...

    There are many thoughts on stock work...obviously an untouched stock should be left untouched...but otherwise it should be carefully thought about...I think that any stocks that are very oil/cosmoline soaked need to be cleaned...petroleum products left soaked in the stock is absolutely deleterious to the wood long term, so I say get that out of there...

    I don't like leaving post war varnish/poly/shellac or anything of the sort on it either.

    But you have to also know, if not done correctly, anything you do could reduce the value of the gun to hard core collectors...so be judicious...

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    RKI- Reasonably Knowledgable Individual heavy_mech's Avatar
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    All good advice. High def pics of the lumber in question would yield some good suggestions I'm sure.
    "Wen Tausend einen Mann erschlagen, das ist nicht Ruhm, das ist nicht Ehre, denn beinsen wird's in späteren tagen gesiegt hat doch das Deutsch Heer. Podest nicht die Paten der Soldaten doner die da Sterben sollen, soll man geben was sie wollen, sahs sie Herzen, sahs sie Küssen, den sie wissen nicht wann sie sterben müssen"

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    RKI- Reasonably Knowledgable Individual heavy_mech's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by morticianman1990 View Post
    I assume a pretty big reason is it stains the wood and leaves the stock in an unoriginal state
    Sorry for the jack.. Your inbox is full
    "Wen Tausend einen Mann erschlagen, das ist nicht Ruhm, das ist nicht Ehre, denn beinsen wird's in späteren tagen gesiegt hat doch das Deutsch Heer. Podest nicht die Paten der Soldaten doner die da Sterben sollen, soll man geben was sie wollen, sahs sie Herzen, sahs sie Küssen, den sie wissen nicht wann sie sterben müssen"

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    Yikes. Well I have a lightly sanded stock that i'm trying to match the hand guard to(the reddish tint). I thought raw linseed oil was good? Guess i got the wrong info. I've already put about 4 coats it. Should i do something else to protect it?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Missourigunguy View Post
    Yikes. Well I have a lightly sanded stock that i'm trying to match the hand guard to(the reddish tint). I thought raw linseed oil was good? Guess i got the wrong info. I've already put about 4 coats it. Should i do something else to protect it?

    Linseed oil on stocks is a very touchy subject here. I see it slightly different than some others. I am in total agreement that if you get a stock that still has its original finish, has not been sanded etc. You don't need to do anything. When I get one like that, if it has surface dirt, I wipe it down with a slightly damp cotton rag, then rub it with a dry cotton cloth, and it is done. After that if you keep it in a humidity controlled enviroment, it should stay stable for your lifetime. When people say they have an extremely dry stock, it does not need oil, which seals moisture out, it just needs to be put in a properly conditioned enviroment, and over time it will absorb moisture from the air. If a stock has already been defaced by sanding, I don't think linseed oil is a bad thing to use. When I first joined an internet forum discussing K98ks many years ago, the experts were adamant that the Germans never used Linseed oil, that was just a US thing. More recent research, much of it done by very knowledgable folks on this forum, has brought to light original German wartime documents that they did use some form of Linseed oil, "linseed oil varnish" on pre war and early war stocks at least. I think the disagreements now are about exactly what "linseed oil varnish" consisted of, and does a similiar product exist today. Later war stocks may or may not have been stained and/or oiled depending on timeframe and maker.

    If your stock was already sanded enough to remove the original finish, then I don't think you have hurt it if linseed oil has been lightly applied. I would think it more correct than a modern product like Howards feed-an-wax which some people approve of.

    The above is my opinion only, and there are others on this forum who I have great respect for and extensive knowledge that will disagree, and I totally respect there opinion.

    good luck

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