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Thread: 1910 Amberg identification

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    Default 1910 Amberg identification

    I inherited this from my dad a long time ago but really never researched this gun til now. Hoping the experts here can help. So i know the obvious. 1910 Amberg kar 98. Stamped 749 on all components. Not sure what the symbols mean. Seems more like a sporting rifle than a combat rifle but honestly not sure. Appreciate everyone’s input.
    Last edited by jwindon; 01-20-2020 at 04:32 PM.

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    Moderator² Loewe's Avatar
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    Amberg made the Kar.98a 1909, 1910 and 1911; 1909 & 1910 are the highest production years, which was small compared to Danzing and Erfurt production. 1911 is scarcer but not by a huge number...

    The acceptance on the right receiver has to do with the receiver and barrel, they are proper for this year. Basically the first deals with the receiver hardening and the second and third dealing with mating and testing the barreled receiver. The Lion next to the serial is the fireproof for Bavarian rifles it will only be seen of rifles that passed through Amberg. Can't say much else with the pictures you show the only real question is whether the bolt matches and what fireproof it has. If the bolt is factory it is generally a big plus, if only the barreled receiver match it isn't worth much in the hobby. Try to do more pictures of all the markings you can find.

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    Thanks for the information. Here are a couple more pics of the markings on the bolt and clip spring. All the components seem to have the same 749 marking. Let me know if there is some other pictures that would be helpful. Thanks again
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by jwindon; 01-21-2020 at 10:32 AM.

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    The stock was throwing me. Couldn't find any other pictures of a 1910 Amberg that quite matched this one. Well, I think I found the reason. The stock is made by Fajen. The hardware seems to be all matching and together, even the screws that attach the stock to the gun are stamped. However, someone must of replaced the original stock with an aftermarket Fajen somewhere in the 50's or 60's.

    Knowing that, how much does that kill the value of the rifle? Thanks again for the insights.

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    Senior Member Kammerjaeger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwindon View Post
    The stock was throwing me. Couldn't find any other pictures of a 1910 Amberg that quite matched this one. Well, I think I found the reason. The stock is made by Fajen. The hardware seems to be all matching and together, even the screws that attach the stock to the gun are stamped. However, someone must of replaced the original stock with an aftermarket Fajen somewhere in the 50's or 60's.

    Knowing that, how much does that kill the value of the rifle? Thanks again for the insights.

    My knowledge of the earlier Mauser's is limited, (Loewe is all knowledgeable here, also Warrior1354) but I can tell you that not having the correct stock and associated hardware on an otherwise all correct WWII era K98k will cut its value by AT LEAST half. And I believe this would presuppose it had a K98k stock/hardware, just not the original that came with it.


    KJ
    "Was wären Ihre Männer lieber, müde oder tot?" - Rommel

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    These things are like Springfield muskets and Krag rifles, in that most of them were cut down or had their stocks messed with. Unless you have basically no money in this, a replacement period stock is probably a losing proposition, as it will cost a lot and still be mismatched.
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    Moderator² Loewe's Avatar
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    Amberg Kar.98a with factory matching bolts are very rare, only a couple known, I owned a 1909 with a matching bolt, but it was a salvaged Erfurt bolt numbered to the rifle (interwar period legit, but not the same as factory) I will check the acceptance of your bolt later but looks good.

    Yes the stock is not original, I thought that obvious so didn't mention it earlier. It is a huge negative, but the remaining metal matching is very good news. It is worth restoring and it retains some of its value because the bolt matches. Would be better if the stock matched, but bolt matching is the second best thing, the bolt alone is probaby worth over $200, factory Amberg bolts are rarely seen and the last one I saw CB bought a rifle to acquire.

    Finding a Bavarian 98a stock will be a challenge, very few were made and loose stocks are impossible to find, I have never seen a loose Amgerg 98a stock before. You will probably have to buy a mismatched rifle to get a Amberg stock, often mismatchers are the resources for restoring a rare rifle, but even that will probably take years to find.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nirvana View Post
    These things are like Springfield muskets and Krag rifles, in that most of them were cut down or had their stocks messed with. Unless you have basically no money in this, a replacement period stock is probably a losing proposition, as it will cost a lot and still be mismatched.
    This is true, seeking a loose Amberg 98a stock will probably take decades and cost as much or more than what you have, - I have found in the past that best way to approach acquiring rare parts is to seek then from mismatchers, most have no idea how to identify a Bavarian stock (or any rare part), so you can sneak up on them sometimes. (though this probably will take many years - Bavarian 98a stocks are hard to find)

    If this rifle has no sentimental value and you are not an avid hunter, you might sell it as it has some value and even though Kar.98a aren't as popular as G98's or 98k the pre-war 98a do have a following that would appreciate this rifle and try to restore it. When I was into 98a's I collected stocks for them, someone out there might actually have a loose Amberg stock

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    Rifle really has no sentimental value. My original intent was to sell it, but I really didn't know much about this particular rifle. It was fun researching it and figuring out what it is. I really appreciate everyone's help. When my grandfather and dad passed, I inherited quite a gun collection. We are/were all avid hunters. This gun, though, sat in the back of my dad's closet for the better part of 40 years. He never shot it that I know of and it was only pulled out a couple times that I recall. Honestly, have no idea where he acquired it, or why. Thus, of all the guns he had, this one was on the sell list as others have many more memories. All that being said, if it only has a value of a couple hundred, then I will probably just throw it back in the safe and keep it as a conversation piece.

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    On the remote possibility that you could be incredibly lucky, I don’t suppose your father had, or kept the original stock and associated hardware?


    KJ
    "Was wären Ihre Männer lieber, müde oder tot?" - Rommel

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