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Thread: 9mm StG hammer - machine shop?

  1. #11
    Senior Member sprat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by actiondan View Post
    It is not a modified original. I bought a spare from RTG to compare. It is, however, the same hammer. The difference is the 9mm hammer is approximately half an inch longer.

    What method are you using to harden?
    I need a comparison photo to go further, I do not understand longer?? you mean taller???. heat to cherry red then quelch (dip) in oil or salt water, I prefer saltwater, then re-heat till it turns bright blue and quelch again,

    I am in the middle of rebuilding a dug lower, I also had to make a selector spring and plunger, and a new post to support the bolt trip,

  2. #12
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    Taller, yes.

    I'll show a comparison as soon as I can.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk

  3. #13
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    Please excuse the dirty hands.

    The lower on this StG44 is an original German piece. So, as I said, previously, the German made hammer fits and functions (by hand), just fine. The blow back bolt, however, does not cause it to move far enough back to catch the trigger reset.

    For reference - several pictures comparing the custom made hammer with a German one. Also is some of the welding and grinding that needed to be done to get the previously cracked hammer to function.

    Hammer1.jpg
    Hammer2.jpg
    Hammer3.jpg
    Hammer4.jpg
    Hammer5.jpg
    Hammer6.jpg
    Hammer7.jpg

  4. #14
    Senior Member sprat's Avatar
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    yes again I would do this by hand, using the modified hammer as a guide - flat steel and drill press and file, heat treat

    that hammer is hand made and not heat treated or no heat treated properly,

    measure the width and height, you might find the steel at Home depot, if not order from online metals or similar company on-line or a local junk yard

  5. #15
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    Good deal. Thanks for the info.

    When you are heat treating, is there a specific temp to keep the piece at or do you quench and let cool completely?

    Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk

  6. #16
    Senior Member sprat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by actiondan View Post
    Good deal. Thanks for the info.

    When you are heat treating, is there a specific temp to keep the piece at or do you quench and let cool completely?

    Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
    old time home builders would go by color "Cherry RED" then quelch, cool, then re-heat to "Blue" quelch again, don't stand over the container with old oil or salt water- splatter. use a mapp torch experiment on scrap.

    this is common procedure found on the internet and I am sure a few Youtube video's by now

  7. #17
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    I'll check it out. Again, thanks.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk

  8. #18
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    You could always weld new metal to the end of the replacement hammer to build it up to length. Clean the finish off where you weld and use a vise
    as a heat sink. Weld a small amount and cool. If you keep the temperature down the heat treat on the operating surfaces should be okay.

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