Third Party Press
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Rust!

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    132

    Default Rust!

    I know it's been discussed many times but I wanted to check in on the consensus for removing rust while leaving original finish intact. What's the best non-abrasive approach for removing flaky surface rust from poor storage? Patience of course, and soaking but what a folks finding works best? Ive used Kroil oil, have seen folks talk about CLP, Ballistoil, there's good old penetrating oil, and I have some bronze wool to loosen and work free. Are these all about the same? I don't want a bright in the white surface and would be happy with a patina remaining with what finish is left.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Central AL
    Posts
    372

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by yellowkid View Post
    I know it's been discussed many times but I wanted to check in on the consensus for removing rust while leaving original finish intact. What's the best non-abrasive approach for removing flaky surface rust from poor storage? Patience of course, and soaking but what a folks finding works best? Ive used Kroil oil, have seen folks talk about CLP, Ballistoil, there's good old penetrating oil, and I have some bronze wool to loosen and work free. Are these all about the same? I don't want a bright in the white surface and would be happy with a patina remaining with what finish is left.
    Eh... lot of different opinions on this. I have had the best luck with Hoppes#9 and brass pennies (before 1977) and bronze wool. For flakey rust, I dab a little Hoppes on it and scrub it off with the edge of the penny. Once the heavy stuff is off, I use the bronze wool and more #9, going slow. I do not soak anything long term or use Kroil very often. My experience is Kroil will take the patina off, leaving bare metal, which is usually pretty ugly.

  3. #3
    "Ach du lieber!" Bigdibbs88's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    SE Mich
    Posts
    1,435

    Default

    IMO bronze wool and oil
    WTB/T e/135 HT rear base

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    N/A
    Posts
    78

    Default

    I use electrolytic rust removal method, try google for details. Work like magic! Many use steel bar as anodes, but I use graphite, not as messes as steel! Hope this help!
    Looking for:

    Decent walnut handguard.
    HT mount.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    132

    Default

    Thx guys some good ideas to consider. The first rule of course is there is no rush to do anything! Jp

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    tx
    Posts
    219

    Default

    What type of finish, phosphate is fragile, I tried bronze wool in a inconspicuous spot on a bcd45 and noticed very fine scratches so quit with that in a hurry. I went the toothbrush route and it was very slow but less harmful, never got too much of the rust off so I can't say that's a 'great' method, more or less wanted to share my experience with the bronze wool.

  7. #7
    Senior Member jbmauser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    510

    Default

    When I first got into collecting German K98k's, one of the first rifles I bought was a sporterized 42 1940. All matching right to the screws but the stock was cut down. It was covered in rust from sitting in a basement for years. Now I would NEVER do this again and I'm NOT recommending it to anyone but I cleaned it up with 0000 steel wool and varsol. I would never touch a k98k with steel wool again and got lucky with this one as it turned out really nice. Since I did this, I read several horror stories about steel wool taking off the original finish so DON'T risk using it.

    Now I'm a firm believer in less is more when cleaning up a K98k. If it doesn't come off with a gentle bronze wool scrub and some oil, then I would just leave it. Oil it to stop any further growth but don't get aggressive trying to remove it. Just my humble opinion.

    Any way here are a couple before shots:
    HPIM5192.jpgHPIM5191.jpgHPIM5198.jpg

    And a couple after shots:
    HPIM5250.jpgHPIM5249.jpgHPIM5253.jpgDSCF2264_zpseee02faf.jpg

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    81

    Default

    My opinion, FWIW, you can be a little more aggressive with the early pre-war guns with a thick rust blue, than with the later-made guns with a thin chemical blue finish.

    If the rust won;t come off with bronze wool or LIGHTLY applied oiled steel wool (extra fine), then chances are it's the thicker, crustier rust with pits underneath and likely no original finish under that area anyhow.

    For this type of crusty rust, I flatten a .30-06 shell casing mouth in the vise and use a file to sharpen to a reasonably sharp blade. The brass will not remove bluing and can be removed later with bore cleaner (some will rub off on the finish). The sharp edge WILL scrape off orange rust scab with ease. Don't expect to find anything except rust patina underneath though and some degree of micro or macro pitting depending on severity. Once you get the crust off so that it doesn't turn into powdery rust dust, rub the area with a copper-dissolving bore cleaner on a rag until clean, then grease or oil the area where the rust was. Not much more you can do for it, but an area with residual rust patina is better than an area with active rust.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •