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Thread: Need help to correct dented/bent milled trigger guard

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerst View Post
    Yes. Machine shops have drills and lathes which make holes and do shaping and grinding but smiths actually shape the metal. One of my old friends learned the trade in Scotland and worked here in Fort Worth making parts for aircraft landing gear. He made me two wedges for splitting wood which are as sharp as the day he gave them to me 40 years ago! Too bad he retired and moved back to Scotland. He knew metal!

    Limitations are important, especially when drinking.
    So are definitely determined so my advice is to move slowly with it. And have you tried a decent heat gun to heat the metal versus a torch? I dont know if thats a silly suggestion or not. I just know those suckers get mighty toasty!

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMB711 View Post
    So are definitely determined so my advice is to move slowly with it. And have you tried a decent heat gun to heat the metal versus a torch? I dont know if thats a silly suggestion or not. I just know those suckers get mighty toasty!
    Only nave a hair drier.

  3. #23
    Senior Member Herk1994's Avatar
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    In my observation, there’s really no solid understanding of metallurgy in this context, in this thread from anyone giving you suggestions.

    I’d just leave the dang thing alone, you might just ruin it in the process and wish you’d have just left it. I’d pick a different rifle to play Betty Crocker Bubba on if I was you. It is a legitimate bolt mismatch after all.
    Last edited by Herk1994; 01-17-2021 at 07:08 PM.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Herk1994 View Post
    In my observation, there’s really no solid understanding of metallurgy in this context, in this thread from anyone giving you suggestions.

    I’d just leave the dang thing alone, you might just ruin it in the process and wish you’d have just left it. I’d pick a different rifle to play Betty Crocker Bubba on if I was you. It is a legitimate bolt mismatch after all.
    Betty Crocker, I like that! Pre-heat oven to 450, then broil for twenty minutes. Let simmer for ten more, then place in vise and apply pressure with metal spatula until done!

  5. #25
    Senior Member reich1900's Avatar
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    It looks like you want to push out the trigger guard a bit. If that so here is what I would do. Get a bolt that just fits inside the tg and nut with a tube that the bolt fits in. Screw the nut all the way in, put the tube on, set it in the tg and slowly back out the nut pushing the tube and bolt head apart. Just might work. Good luck

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by reich1900 View Post
    It looks like you want to push out the trigger guard a bit. If that so here is what I would do. Get a bolt that just fits inside the tg and nut with a tube that the bolt fits in. Screw the nut all the way in, put the tube on, set it in the tg and slowly back out the nut pushing the tube and bolt head apart. Just might work. Good luck
    I’ve been doing the “bolt and nut” procedure and got a lot if the dent out but it is hard to apply pressure in the right place because I am dealing with one curved surface and the flat part of the guard means that the bolt is at an angle and tries to slide away.

    A wooden wedge might work but I’d pretty much have to start with a solid peace of hard wood pretty much filling the whole loop and then inserting a smaller wedge where the loop needs to be pushed out and hammering from one side, then the other.

    In the field the armorer would toss the old part and install a new one - a five minute (or less) repair job!

  7. #27
    Senior Member reich1900's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerst View Post
    I’ve been doing the “bolt and nut” procedure and got a lot if the dent out but it is hard to apply pressure in the right place because I am dealing with one curved surface and the flat part of the guard means that the bolt is at an angle and tries to slide away.

    A wooden wedge might work but I’d pretty much have to start with a solid peace of hard wood pretty much filling the whole loop and then inserting a smaller wedge where the loop needs to be pushed out and hammering from one side, then the other.

    In the field the armorer would toss the old part and install a new one - a five minute (or less) repair job!
    Gerst, try it with a flat headed bolt. Wood wouldn't do it because it's to soft. Here is an up grade to my original idea. Do the same as before but add a screw C clamp to the outside putting pressure that forces the tg together. Doing both at the same time.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by reich1900 View Post
    Gerst, try it with a flat headed bolt. Wood wouldn't do it because it's to soft. Here is an up grade to my original idea. Do the same as before but add a screw C clamp to the outside putting pressure that forces the tg together. Doing both at the same time.
    I don’t want to use any metal on the outside, even with heavy tape, because of the risk of damaging the loop.

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