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Thread: Polish 1923 W98

  1. #1
    Senior Member runner's Avatar
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    Default Polish 1923 W98

    Last night I posted photos of a stock asking for ID. As I had hoped it was Polish. Today I got what was left of the rifle (still hoping the bolt turns up).

    Everyone here in the Commonwealth of Virginia can rest better now, knowing that this rare Polish W98 has been taken off the streets and destroyed. The remains of the
    rifle were sold off at a Police auction.
    The receiver was cut in two just behind the receiver ring. They were even careful to cut each side of the receiver in different places. Sad for the rifle,
    but think of the lives saved by keeping this favorite weapon of gangs off the streets,, nothing like a 49 inch , five shot bolt action for the perfect drive by weapon... Ok, rant off.

    I compared this to my matching 1924 W98 and the only difference that was apparent was the addition of the triangle Z mark on the 1923. It is evident by the light markings
    on the receiver that this action was buffed and blued. I think the bluing may have been done when it went into German hands, (see my earlier postings on the stock) The serial number on this receiver matches the serial number that runs lengthwise on the stock, not the one in the barrel channel, indication the stock was recycled as well. With the stock being salvaged and the receiver appearing to be buffed, I am speculating that
    the triangle Z on the top of the receiver may indicate it was recycled through a Polish arsenal at some point? Pure speculation on my part. Anyway, hopefully some useful data can be gleaned
    from this remnant.
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  2. #2
    Baby Face RyanE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by runner View Post
    I compared this to my matching 1924 W98 and the only difference that was apparent was the addition of the triangle Z mark on the 1923. It is evident by the light markings
    on the receiver that this action was buffed and blued. I think the bluing may have been done when it went into German hands, (see my earlier postings on the stock) The serial number on this receiver matches the serial number that runs lengthwise on the stock, not the one in the barrel channel, indication the stock was recycled as well. With the stock being salvaged and the receiver appearing to be buffed, I am speculating that
    the triangle Z on the top of the receiver may indicate it was recycled through a Polish arsenal at some point? Pure speculation on my part. Anyway, hopefully some useful data can be gleaned
    from this remnant.
    The triangle Z indicates it cycled though Zbrojownia Nr.2 in Warsaw for rework. They stamped the ZW inspection on the stock at the same time.



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  3. #3
    Moderator² Loewe's Avatar
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    Frank, that is a real shame there... this is the earliest Polish rifle variation and surely one of the first Poland made themselves, only one other 1923 has been recorded by me in 10-15 years and this one looks like ti was once in better condition (the other is sporterized and has a dirty bird/FP on it); though yours seems to be a Polish rework, the Z-pyramid supposedly is an ordnance depot marking and this rifle probably was reworked and given the K-prefix. Which seems to date this work considerably after 1923 and therefore one could "assume" the German rifles that carry similar Z-build features were probably done in the late 1920's or early 1930's. Though I would have to review the article I have that discusses Poland's early efforts at rearmament (acquiring rifle sales from other countries, swaps included, - the Poles tried to buy German rifles from Germany, but although the French tried to get this approved England wouldn't hear of it... but it is a sure bet quite a few G98's were sold illegally to Poland, several cases of these illegal arms shipments hit the German press at the time, even sales to Russia..)

    Anyway, it is really a sad case they ruined such a rare rifle, though your efforts to recover it and save it for its stock and share its details are a silver lining! Of all the Polish rifles, these early variations, maker-dates, are the most elusive and therefore the most important, - K98's and Wz.29's are a dime a dozen by comparison...

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