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Thread: Matching vs mismatch price diff

  1. #1
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    Default Matching vs mismatch price diff

    Just wondering how much a premium on a K98 is having a matching bolt or stock? And if you had something none matching what would be the least problematic part not to match.

    I've seen a few really nice k98s (1937 an 1938s s/42) but had diff bolt or different stock. And then ive seen matching 1945 guns going for 2800..
    To me the late k98s have poor quality even if all matching. So I'm thinking I would rather have a earlier one with better markings and parts.

    Also wondering how they get mismatched.

    - Bolts - yes that is common
    - stocks - not sure why some have a diff stock. I can see why the bolts dont always match due to them pulling them out putting in buckets
    - floor plate - no idea why.

    If the bolt is self matched but not to the gun does that make it less acurrate or issues firing it?

    Oh and thoughts of K98s that look pretty new but then you see someone reblued it and buffed all the metal to make it shiny. Does this devalue the gun vs say one that is dull but with original finish of stock and barrel?

    Thanks !

  2. #2
    Senior Member hale1940's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobmauser View Post
    Just wondering how much a premium on a K98 is having a matching bolt or stock? And if you had something none matching what would be the least problematic part not to match.

    I've seen a few really nice k98s (1937 an 1938s s/42) but had diff bolt or different stock. And then ive seen matching 1945 guns going for 2800..
    To me the late k98s have poor quality even if all matching. So I'm thinking I would rather have a earlier one with better markings and parts.

    Also wondering how they get mismatched.

    - Bolts - yes that is common
    - stocks - not sure why some have a diff stock. I can see why the bolts dont always match due to them pulling them out putting in buckets
    - floor plate - no idea why.

    If the bolt is self matched but not to the gun does that make it less acurrate or issues firing it?

    Oh and thoughts of K98s that look pretty new but then you see someone reblued it and buffed all the metal to make it shiny. Does this devalue the gun vs say one that is dull but with original finish of stock and barrel?

    Thanks !
    Obviously all matching is what is most desired. Then its smaller pats, like the safety or a barrel band. When it comes to something big, like the stock or bolt, it seems most people will go for the bolt mm rather than the stock mm. Bolts were removed for various reasons, mostly lost to time, and were easily removable in the first place. The stock has always seemed, at least to me, to be a integral part of the aesthetic of each individual rifle.

    When it comes to 'why' or 'how' parts got mismatched thats very hard to say. Generally speaking, they are probably not wartime (despite what some people will try and say). Sure, there are examples were perhaps a wartime mismatch seems likely; I have rifle were the floor plate and follower are mismatched (matching each other) but are very close in serial to the rest of the rifle, are properly coded, and have the same patina, but will never know for sure. When it comes to bolts, there is the old stories of Germany troops taking their bolts out prior to or during the surrender process, then GI's refitting the bolts without care for serial (this process is debated still today). Then there is the stories of 50's and 60's importers bringing in rifles with bolts out and then also returned them haphazardly. When it comes to stock mm, it seems likely a lot of these are restored sporters.

    A bolt mm should be safe to fire, baring any other issues. Less accurate? probably not, but that likely depends on each rifle/bolt.

    Any rifle that has been messed with post war, especially by bubba, has significantly lost its collector value. Sanded/refinished stocks, reblued or buffed parts are a big no go for lots of people (including myself). Authenticity and honesty is the name of the game.

  3. #3
    Super Over the Top Moderator -1/2 bruce98k's Avatar
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    Default Bolt MM pricing

    Generally the MM bolt knocks the price down by 50-60%.
    Say you have a 3000.00 matched gun in 90% condition.
    Well knock that down to 1500.00 if bolt MM.

    That's the general rule that's been in place for as long as I can remember.

    There may be special cases such as super rare codes, snipers and SS guns, but that
    50% generally applies to most of the rifles sold as such.
    ---- Turbo Myš ----

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    Quote Originally Posted by bruce98k View Post
    Generally the MM bolt knocks the price down by 50-60%.
    Say you have a 3000.00 matched gun in 90% condition.
    Well knock that down to 1500.00 if bolt MM.

    That's the general rule that's been in place for as long as I can remember.

    There may be special cases such as super rare codes, snipers and SS guns, but that
    50% generally applies to most of the rifles sold as such.
    Wow did not realize it was that much. I saw a matched k98 a few months ago that i barely lost out to. I think it sold for 1900. Now they all like 2500 due to covid crazyness and maybe Biden. Not sure but prices are up. So a similar gun would be 2500/2 = 1250 price if it had mm bolt and stock?

    Just trying to get a handle on prices and value. I saw a sanded down buffed out k98 with mostly matching but the front metal band. Was like 800.00 the a NR bidder came it racked it up to 1750. It looked nice like a Mitchells mauser but at the same time it had non original bluing and buff marks on all the parts to make them look like new. I sort of like the beat up natural look but that buff job did give it eye candy appeal to one guy.

    MODEDIT - Removal of ongoing auction link

    Ooops sorry did not realize that was a no no to post link. Can I post photos so i can show people what I am talking about?
    Trying to learn the finer side of k98 is all. Thanks
    Last edited by Bobmauser; 04-06-2021 at 12:44 PM.

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    Senior Member mto7464's Avatar
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    You are not suppose to post live auctions.

    The "drilled" markings look like one in the pic sticky, so its normal. Bluing looks normal to me. Overall a nice uncommom rifle. The stock where it is marked is odd. Can't figure out what happened there.
    Last edited by mto7464; 04-06-2021 at 12:27 PM.

  6. #6
    Community Organizer Hambone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mto7464 View Post
    You are not suppose to post live auctions.

    The "drilled" markings look like one in the pic sticky, so its normal. Bluing looks normal to me. Overall a nice uncommom rifle. The stock where it is marked is odd. Can't figure out what happened there.
    Looks like humpery and wankery to me. That would not have left the factory like that, particularly that early. The inspections popped in it don't look right either.
    “Not every item of news should be published. Rather must those who control news policies endeavor to make every item of news serve a certain purpose.” - Dr. Joseph Goebbels, Reich Ministry of Public Enlightenment and Propaganda, 1933-1945

  7. #7
    Community Organizer Hambone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bruce98k View Post
    Generally the MM bolt knocks the price down by 50-60%.
    Say you have a 3000.00 matched gun in 90% condition.
    Well knock that down to 1500.00 if bolt MM.

    That's the general rule that's been in place for as long as I can remember.

    There may be special cases such as super rare codes, snipers and SS guns, but that
    50% generally applies to most of the rifles sold as such.
    This, since the early 80s, which is when I bought my first K98k.
    “Not every item of news should be published. Rather must those who control news policies endeavor to make every item of news serve a certain purpose.” - Dr. Joseph Goebbels, Reich Ministry of Public Enlightenment and Propaganda, 1933-1945

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    Quote Originally Posted by mto7464 View Post
    You are not suppose to post live auctions.

    The "drilled" markings look like one in the pic sticky, so its normal. Bluing looks normal to me. Overall a nice uncommom rifle. The stock where it is marked is odd. Can't figure out what happened there.
    Sorry did not realize or forgot that was a no no. Was it ok to post a picture of K98 markings? That is gone too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hambone View Post
    Looks like humpery and wankery to me. That would not have left the factory like that, particularly that early. The inspections popped in it don't look right either.
    those drilled out swatztika under the eagles what is that? Never seen one like that. That is normal? Normally you see the ZZ pattern under them. All my P08s and P 38s have it under the eagles most k98s I have see do too.

  10. #10
    Senior Member mto7464's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hambone View Post
    Looks like humpery and wankery to me. That would not have left the factory like that, particularly that early. The inspections popped in it don't look right either.
    Hambone, look at the one in the pic sticky. Proofs are deep and look the same.
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