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Argentine Model 1909 Boehler barrel composition

Cleo45

Junior Member
I recently acquired a near-mint Argentine Model 1909 infantry rifle and read in Colin Webster's book "Argentine Mauser Rifles 1871-1959", that Model 1909 barrels were made of "Boehler Tungsten alloy steel identified as W.II G 45". Although climate and care play a major roll in how well a milsurp survives the ravages of time, I have always been curious as to why some barrel, bolt or receiver metals are significantly more resistant to corrosion than others. I am curious as to whether or not this particular Boehler tungsten steel is more corrosion resistant because of its composition or if it was simply good care and the drier Argentine climate that kept this rifle in near-new condition.

So I hopped on the web and searched for permutations of this particular steel, and got nowhere, possibly because this specific alloy was used prior to WWI and is likely no longer in use or no longer so-designated. I also searched a couple of other milsurp forums and got some background info and a recommendation to drop my question on this forum.

Can anyone recommend a good source for the metallurgical compositions for steels used in milsurps, particularly those made from 1890-1920 or so? Thanks!

Cleo
 

Muncher 1953

Senior Member
I think Webster cites the original contracts, indicating that either 3or 5 spare barrels PER rifle were furnished, and from my own small collection of 1909s, I believe they were extensively refurbished & reworked before the Argentines began making their own 1909s around 1947. AND, no “major” wars, mostly border conflicts & suppression of indigenous peoples..........I have 2 cavalry carbines & 1 engineers rifle, love that 7.65x53!
 

Cleo45

Junior Member
Thanks for the Bohler web address, I will see what they can tell me. I have received some German docs showing the composition of Bohler steel barrel blanks for the early K98k production and it had 1.75-2.00% tungsten and nearly twice the carbon as a standard Springfield barrel. Sadly, I don't know if the K98k Bohler steel was the same as the Bohler steel used on the Argies 20 years previously. Maybe the Bohler folks can answer that.

Dirty little secret here in Alaska during these days of nearly no ammo on store shelves and zero reloading components to be had: you can still buy PPU 7.65 x 53mm any day of the week! The loading is a bit inconsistent but still fun to shoot. And check out Iraq8888 video shooting a M1909 cav carbine at 600 yards with this ammo - it was amazingly accurate even at that extreme range using those crude Mauser iron sights! As Muncher said, love that 7.65 x 53mm!
 

Fal Grunt

Senior Member
Cleo, I will post those docs here tomorrow if I get a chance.

I don’t know if I can post it here, but I have a video of a friend ringing steel at 1000yds with his 1909 rifle using PPU.
 

Cleo45

Junior Member
Thanks FAL Grunt, that would be great!

I can barely see a gong at 1,000 yards, let alone hit one with iron sights! Very impressive! It also shows us what can be done with a milsurp in the hands of a true marksman.
 

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