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AZF M91 Long Rifle w/ Odd Marking

Mike2994

Well-known member
I purchased this AZF M91 long rifle from a show and cannot figure out the stock marking. The rifle is a matching 1894 Terni w/ a 1941 Terni refurb marking. The bolt is possibly(?) blued, but I think it is just wear.

The stock marking is a strange stylized “HAS” mark which reminds me of certain Italian & German markings. The size is larger than the typical Italian markings. Perhaps a district or factory marking? Has anyone seen this marking before?

This marking is of much higher quality than what I would think a GI would carve into a stock.
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The bolts on M91s and M41s should be straight, so this one was originally issued on a carbine or short rifle.

I can't say for sure, but the stamp appears to have been carefully impressed into the stock letter by letter rather than being one unitary stamp. I would lean towards post-war for it.
 
The bolts on M91s and M41s should be straight, so this one was originally issued on a carbine or short rifle.

I can't say for sure, but the stamp appears to have been carefully impressed into the stock letter by letter rather than being one unitary stamp. I would lean towards post-war for it.
Pat,
I had debated on putting a spare straight bolt in the rifle as that would be correct however I decided against it.
 
According to Heino Hintermeiers book captured Italian M.91 rifles were reworked from 6,5x52 Carcano to the Greek 6.5 mm (M.3/14 cartridge) by altering the chamber; these rifles were initially stamped with an approximately 2cm tall JT.U.GR. stamp on the right side of the stock as well as the barrel shank, sometimes also the receiver, with AZF. It seems that these rifles sometimes had troubles when nevertheless Italian 6.5 Carcano was being used, therefore order was given to only use them with the Greek ammo. Around 35.000 rifles were converted of which 29.500 were already used by troops per 3rd August 1916. There by the way were also ideas to rework the Carcano to 7x57 caliber. Finally he mentinos that the already adopted captured Italian M.91 rifles, which were ONLY for the usage with the Greek round, the designation 6.5 M.S. was added to the right side of the receiver and the marking to the stock removed or not added any more.

Overall, maybe worth doing a chamber cast and see whether it is modified. This seems to suggest that it was.
 
According to Heino Hintermeiers book captured Italian M.91 rifles were reworked from 6,5x52 Carcano to the Greek 6.5 mm (M.3/14 cartridge) by altering the chamber; these rifles were initially stamped with an approximately 2cm tall JT.U.GR. stamp on the right side of the stock as well as the barrel shank, sometimes also the receiver, with AZF. It seems that these rifles sometimes had troubles when nevertheless Italian 6.5 Carcano was being used, therefore order was given to only use them with the Greek ammo. Around 35.000 rifles were converted of which 29.500 were already used by troops per 3rd August 1916. There by the way were also ideas to rework the Carcano to 7x57 caliber. Finally he mentinos that the already adopted captured Italian M.91 rifles, which were ONLY for the usage with the Greek round, the designation 6.5 M.S. was added to the right side of the receiver and the marking to the stock removed or not added any more.

Overall, maybe worth doing a chamber cast and see whether it is modified. This seems to suggest that it was.
I did not think of the 6.5 MS conversion possibility as I did not see the JTUGR marking. I will have to attempt to chamber a 6.5 MS round.

“HAS” could possibly be a conversion marking to 6.5 MS.
 
HAS could be capturer or GI initials, doesnt look like period arsenal marking, more real carved into stock by someone.
 
The stock is a replacement stock, so I don't think the HAS has anything to do with WW1.

IMO, the marking is too professional to be someones initials. I think it could be some sort of company logo.
 
For clarification, JT.U.GR. means "Italienisch und Griechisch", basically "Italian and Greek". If it was 6,5 Greek only then the JT (for Italian) would be incorrect, therefore it was later not added any more.

Keen to hear if you can chamber the 6,5 Greek. I'd assume yes.
 
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Difference is in chamber area as the italian is 52 and greek is 53,5mm lenght of case, and some details.
 

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