Third Party Press

Capture papers, how to preserve them ??

George R.

Well-known member
What is a good way to store and preserve capture papers and early documents from the WW2 period, right now I just have them in the safe out of sunlight and moisture, now I noticed that seem to be to dry, ideas suggestions. Thanks GR
 

WaA623

Well-known member
I have always herd and followed the rule of using a soft plastic sleeve that are labeled "archival safe" as they are made acid free. A company called ultra*pro makes them and they can usually be found in coin and collectable shops and range in size from stamp size to newspaper size.
Good luck
 

Peter U

Moderator
Staff member
Hello George,

WW2 paper, specially German wartime paper, can be something difficult to preserve.
My WW2 documents I keep in good quality, acid free, plastic covers, backed up with thick acid free paper.
Also I iron my documents, folds and donkey ears can create weak spots in the document.
When I iron them I put the documents between two pieces of thick acid free paper and a tea towel, the iron isn't to hot of course.
If you want to do this, first experiment a bit with old newspapers and other worthless folded documents, what works for them will work for the documents you want to preserve.

The standard A4 size plastic covers I just buy with a local office equipement shop and my special size plastic covers, for my first empire documents, I buy from a specialist dealer.
They are rather expensive, but 200 year old are older paper needs it to stay in good shape.
Like I said, because of the very poor quality of German WW2 paper it can be a pain in the ass to preserve. In my collection I have a well used French paybook from the 1812 period that is in much better condition then most of my WW2 Soldbucher.

Cheers,
Peter
 

miles136

Well-known member
Peter, I think Brian showed you pics of my soldbuch, the K43 with zf4 soldier?

anyway, how can I best preserve it? it kind of scares me....like I should be doing something more to help preserve it...

also there are two pages that are still stuck together, and the layer on one page is tearing off due to sticking to the other page...anyway I can free it up? there is another page where this happened already and there was a transfer I dont think can be fixed?

Im going to buy some acid free plastic sheets and cut them to fit in between each page
 

Peter U

Moderator
Staff member
Hello miles136,

Indeed I have seen more pictures of your Soldbuch and I can tell you that it isn't in bad shape at all.
Btw if you would be intrested to post them, I'll explain the entire story.
Preserving it shouldn't scare you at all.
Like I said in my collection I have Soldbucher that are in much worse condition and they don't fall apart in my hands.
The page that are stuck together are most likely the pages of the clothing that has been issued to the soldier; also nothing to worry about, don't try to free it, just leave it alone.
Don't put anything between the pages, you'll just make the Soldbuch thicker and thus strech the spin even more.
The best way to keep this and any other WW2 Soldbuch is to put it in to an acid free plastic cover and keep it in a dry enviroment and handle it with care when you take a look in it.
If you want to be extra careful you can wear white museum gloves when handling the Soldbuch. I must admit that I don't always use them althoug I should, because the natural greas and sweat on your fingers can do a lot of damage to old paper.

Cheers,
Peter
 

Dennisb

Registered
Hello George,

WW2 paper, specially German wartime paper, can be something difficult to preserve.
My WW2 documents I keep in good quality, acid free, plastic covers, backed up with thick acid free paper.
Also I iron my documents, folds and donkey ears can create weak spots in the document.
When I iron them I put the documents between two pieces of thick acid free paper and a tea towel, the iron isn't to hot of course.
If you want to do this, first experiment a bit with old newspapers and other worthless folded documents, what works for them will work for the documents you want to preserve.

The standard A4 size plastic covers I just buy with a local office equipement shop and my special size plastic covers, for my first empire documents, I buy from a specialist dealer.
They are rather expensive, but 200 year old are older paper needs it to stay in good shape.
Like I said, because of the very poor quality of German WW2 paper it can be a pain in the ass to preserve. In my collection I have a well used French paybook from the 1812 period that is in much better condition then most of my WW2 Soldbucher.

Cheers,
Peter


Peter, does this man probably have a website?
 

Hambone

Community Organizer
Staff member
Good discussion worth saving in FAQs / pic sticky.

Peter, are the "acid free" "archival document covers" one sees advertised as such at office supply houses usually sufficient for WW2 docs?
 

Peter U

Moderator
Staff member
Peter, are the "acid free" "archival document covers" one sees advertised as such at office supply houses usually sufficient for WW2 docs?

- Yes they are, I never had problems with them; I even keep some of my early 19th century documents in them.


Cheers,
Peter
 

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