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K98k 237 1940 question

bootboy1

Member
Hello, I just bought an all matching 237/1940 coded rifle. The only thing that makes me curious is the Waa63 stamp on the stock, I can´t find anything about it , but it has a cupped butt plate, and the slots for the frontsight hood, which is not common for the time. It also has an A (Ausschuss) stamp on the right side of the receiver. Does anyone have infos on this? Thank you very much in advance! WhatsApp Image 2022-09-21 at 15.01.11 (5).jpegDoes anyone have infos on this ?WhatsApp Image 2022-09-21 at 22.16.35.jpeg

WhatsApp Image 2022-09-21 at 15.01.10.jpegWhatsApp Image 2022-09-21 at 15.01.11 (1).jpegWhatsApp Image 2022-09-21 at 15.01.09 (1).jpegWhatsApp Image 2022-09-21 at 15.01.09.jpegWhatsApp Image 2022-09-21 at 15.01.10 (1).jpegWhatsApp Image 2022-09-21 at 15.01.10 (2).jpegWhatsApp Image 2022-09-21 at 15.01.11 (2).jpegWhatsApp Image 2022-09-21 at 15.01.11 (3).jpegWhatsApp Image 2022-09-21 at 15.01.11 (4).jpegWhatsApp Image 2022-09-21 at 15.01.11.jpegWhatsApp Image 2022-09-21 at 17.04.47.jpegWhatsApp Image 2022-09-21 at 17.30.52.jpeg
 

Zeppelin5000

Senior Member
I wondered that too. Kind of sounded like he did. It's bad when you can see the old numbers under the new ones.
People know there's money in matching 98k's and they take advantage of that fact. Unfortunately, there's a lot of uninformed buyers who get duped by taking peoples word that one's matching.
 

Absolut

Senior Member
He is a personal friend of mine, I recommended him to post it here because it looked off at first glance. He knows his stuff well and in the past I did buy a few items from him that I had posted here. The one thing that made me scratch my head on this particular rifle was the circled A. I've seen this in the past, and most of the time in very odd configurations, and many times based on (S/)237 coded receivers. So I thought it has a chance to be a weird build from the end of war, but maybe someone else can give better insight.

As a reminder/comparison:
Plus various SS rifles based on scrubbed 237 rifles posted on GB:
 

bootboy1

Member
I posted it here cause of Absolut´s advice, the fact that this particular rifle is from a good source made me buy it. I don´t want to share some weird stories, but this particular rifle comes from an old farmhouse, directly from the retreat line of the German Army in Austria at the end of the war...it has not been at a dealer or in collectors hands before. Looking at the old grease it was in and the overall condition made me buy it. I´m not a newbie in collecting k98k but I never owned one in this setup, so I thought I take the advice from my good friend and ask here. I forgot to post pics of the whole gun. Sorry but the light in my room makes it appear too shiny.WhatsApp Image 2022-09-23 at 14.25.17.jpegWhatsApp Image 2022-09-23 at 14.25.16 (1).jpeg
 

Herk1994

Senior Member
The only legitimate marking that stands out to me is the 237 and 1940 on the receiver. That’s a lot of fake serial numbers…. It’s definitely been through someone’s hands, with a fancy story to reel someone in to buy it.
 

mauser99

Senior Member
looks to be some sort of Russian or eastern block refurb.. you can actually see the low spot/cleaned ect. area on the stock below the disc where the added ser # was removed..

The source and the stories mean nothing if the item itself is bad..
 

Cyrano4747

Well-known member
He is a personal friend of mine, I recommended him to post it here because it looked off at first glance. He knows his stuff well and in the past I did buy a few items from him that I had posted here. The one thing that made me scratch my head on this particular rifle was the circled A. I've seen this in the past, and most of the time in very odd configurations, and many times based on (S/)237 coded receivers. So I thought it has a chance to be a weird build from the end of war, but maybe someone else can give better insight.

As a reminder/comparison:
Plus various SS rifles based on scrubbed 237 rifles posted on GB:

My understanding is that there are two types of Circle-A stamps - one that was used for rejected parts in German service, and the other was an inspection stamp in Norway when they brought the guns into service there. The inspector with that stamp had a last name that began with "A" from what I recall.

Anyways, from what I recall the ones where the Circle-A is neatly placed on the right side of the receiver ring are the Norwegian ones. Lots of early war guns in the stocks that Norway inherited as well. So maybe a Norwegian rifle that worked its way back home?

Does anyone know if the Norwegians left any of their guns in 8mm? The ones I'm familiar with all have the milled out chunk on the receiver and are re-barreled in .30-06.

edit: Found an old thread with a norwegian k98k (30-06) with that circle-A stamp and people talking about the inspector:

 

Absolut

Senior Member
Thanks. So this is a Norwegian rifle that someone "built back" to "all German" configuration. He must had also removed the Norwegian stamps on the receiver then. I wonder why someone goes through this much hassle to then use so weird stock stamps ..
 

GeeRam

Senior Member
Yes, some of them are still in 8mm, I believe it’s just those for the Navy, but I’m not positive on the details.

Yes, I have an ex-Norwegian Navy K98k, a 243 1940, that is still in 8mm, and must be a rarity being a double Navy issue, as it was originally a Kriegsmarine issue. Its a bolt-miss match only, and it does not have the A in a circle stamp on the receiver.
I used to own a ex-Norwegian (Heer) issue K98kF1 in 30-06, a 147 1940, that did have the A in a circle stamp, so guessing the A in a circle stamp was a post war stamp done after the 30-06 conversion in the 50's?

That would be a lot of work to 'fill in' the milled receiver side that the Norwegians did to add the Norwegian serial number to, and reblue etc, plus the notch for the longer 30-06 round...!!
I think in the top shot of the receiver, you maybe can just see where that was done, now that it something to look for....?
 
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