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Kriegs and Late War Welding Process on Front and Rear Bands

Winchester Cowboy

Senior Member
On the Welded Late war Bands:

What Type of Welding? Gas or Electric Arc?

Was it done manually by hand one at a time or somewhat automated?
 

ditch68

I Like Bunnies
Well, metal ard (MIG or "wire welding") wasn't really perfected until the late 40's or early 50's, so I would guess stick arc welded (shielded metal arc), that had been around for years before, and is the easiest from a manufacturing standpoint skill-wise versus gas. I'm sure it was all by hand.


Jeff
 

ditch68

I Like Bunnies
I would imagine so. In the sheet metal shop I worked in for many years (both on the floor and engineering), we fixtured all we could provided it was for a quantity large enough to justify the work put into building the fixture.

Jeff
 

Winchester Cowboy

Senior Member
Is there any pics that ever surfaced from the assembly line, machine shop, stamping/forging presses, etc for bands, springs, etc.
 

8x57JS

Member
welded bands

My post war Brno 8mm has the welded front band, it certainly doesn't affect accuracy at all.:biggrin1:
The cleaning rod is present and it has the Czech front sight protector too. I was surprised that it had a nice walnut stock instead of the laminated version.
 

ditch68

I Like Bunnies
This is how I envision the production process for bands, you'll see that all this type of stuff is very common to any metal stamping operation.

The rear (or lower) band is a two-piece stamping. The main body of it is one, and the inner lining surface of the sling slot is a second piece. The main part was likely a multi-stage die. One to stamp and cut the main shape with the embossed stiffening channel, and another stage to cut the oblong slot for the sling slot. The flat blank with the sling slot was likely curled in a roller to the final shape. A simple clamp jig would pinch it in place for the welder to close it up the last couple millimeters, I'd imagine. The second part of the sling slot would be a flattenned elongated tube, cut to length, and then inserted and flared and crimped into the cut slot. You can feel it if you take a fingernail and wedge it along the band, look closely and you can see the two pieces. Same thing with the inner sleeve of a stamped triggerguard, the inside part adjacent to the trigger itself.

The upper band is simpler, maybe a single stage with a roller step, then weld. The spring fastening hole would be part of the stamping of the shape, they may have hand drilled or punch pressed the screw hole for Kriegsmodells and hand countersunk it, but punch presses are capable of dies which stamp the countersink as a second operation over a slightly oversized pilot hole which allows for expansion of the steel around the pressing toward the hole center, so both operations could have been drilled or punched interchangably.

I say the KM screw hole was likely a second hand operation simply because if they bothered modifying the die, they may have eliminated the punch for the spring hole. Or just left it so KM bands could be used on KM and non- KM rifles. Who knows, but that is a basic overview of the most likely (by virtue of manufacturing practacality) steps involved.

Compare all this to the extremely complex and time consuming process of producing the same milled and machined parts. The time and material savings for like stamped parts would have been enormous.

Jeff
 
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quickgene

Active member
Great thread ! Great info. Imagine working under wartime Germany's conditions.
You wouldn't want to piss off the boss.
If you come up with a good idea it better work out or else. No $300 hammers there. Gene
 

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