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M.40 Heer Normandy Nebelwerfer Unit Helmet

Hambone

Community Organizer
Staff member
How helmets of a unit, named and FPNd together end up together....Look at the NCO up front with the MP.40 with at least three solo tank kills.......


Surrender pile.jpg
 

mauser99

Senior Member
I thought the same thing but It almost looks like he has a tool in his hand. Maybe scraping off the party shield?
if you study the photo he's actually hand painting on the tricolor or bi color shield. this is a pre war photo and these shields were painted not a decal.. The point being made is seeing all the shells with names and rank is one man typically did this for the unit or company. Each guy didnt do it them selves typically. But, there are and have to be exceptions.
 

mrfarb

No War Eagles For You!
Staff member
I can’t add much to the history/validity, but I have the skill to paint names in helmets. I did it for my Reenactor unit for a while, 20 years ago. When I did it, I did a bunch at once that all looked nearly the same. As new members joined I did more, sometimes in batches. Those looked similar but I didn’t care as much, and the workmanship suffered if I was hung over or tired.

It’s circumstantial but the point is as new guys join new helmets were named, but unit info was consistently applied like these.
 

Hambone

Community Organizer
Staff member
Well Farb, that sounds like keeping it real in all respects. With named helmets I was always impressed by German penmanship and neatness particularly as these were enlisted troops. This is skewed by the reality that most of the time, just like camouflage application and overpainting, individual soldiers were not left to this task, it was assigned to those most capable. It beats Latrine duty.
 

Peter U

Moderator
Staff member
Well Farb, that sounds like keeping it real in all respects. With named helmets I was always impressed by German penmanship and neatness particularly as these were enlisted troops. This is skewed by the reality that most of the time, just like camouflage application and overpainting, individual soldiers were not left to this task, it was assigned to those most capable. It beats Latrine duty.
In those days men that had attended school beyond their 14th year would have got calligraphy lessons, clean/nice handwriting was considered necessary for office jobs.
 

CanadianAR

Maple Syrup Mod Eh
Staff member
I can’t add much to the history/validity, but I have the skill to paint names in helmets. I did it for my Reenactor unit for a while, 20 years ago. When I did it, I did a bunch at once that all looked nearly the same. As new members joined I did more, sometimes in batches. Those looked similar but I didn’t care as much, and the workmanship suffered if I was hung over or tired.

It’s circumstantial but the point is as new guys join new helmets were named, but unit info was consistently applied like these.
This sounds like Farb admitting he consigned his units helmets! Hahah JK
 

Peter U

Moderator
Staff member
it possible to find 2 pistols or rifles consecutively numbered and that does not make them fake or renumbered. Just a little common since in a world that has gone off the edge. It also doesn’t mean you don’t need to pay attention either. My thoughts anyway. Larry
A bit of topic, but evidence that lightning strikes can happen.

Since this week there are two consecutively numbered P1796LC cavalry sabers in my collection.
The serial numbers are Dutch Army serial numbers from the 1840's, both sabers are battle of Waterloo veterans.
 

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CanadianAR

Maple Syrup Mod Eh
Staff member
That’s crazy!! Very cool. Maybe post them on their own in off topic, I’d love to see them
 

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