Third Party Press

Mauser K98 Jubilaum

Greenmachine

Well-known member
Hello all

Have been offered a ?1998 Mauser K98 Jubilaum edition. The only record or info I can find about them is a poster from the time. Does anyone here have one/fired one/can offer an opinion on them? I also believe they issued @2k G98’s as well.

Feedback most welcome.

Ty
 

Pisgah

Moderator²
Staff member
They were evidently high quality and pretty cool but I am not sure how many came to the US. As you stated, they came out in 1998 and if my memory his correct they were priced higher than $2,000 then. Using an inflation calculator that amount is over $3,400 in today's dollars so I am guessing there aren't many here.
 

pwcosol

Senior Member
I was under the impression these rifles were non-importable to the USA because they neither fit the "sporting" configuration nor qualified as C & Rs. I did hear some came into Canada, though...
 
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Greenmachine

Well-known member
Well, have purchased said rifle. I took the view there maybe as few as 1000 of the K98 made so why not? It’s a one owner rifle. Arrives in the post hopefully later this week. I’ll take some pics for reference purposes. I can’t substantiate it but I’ve heard from several sources they used left over receivers/furniture. How true this is I am not sure but may make sense in that tooling up for just a low volume rifle wouldn’t make economical sense.
 

Muncher 1953

Senior Member
Well, have purchased said rifle. I took the view there maybe as few as 1000 of the K98 made so why not? It’s a one owner rifle. Arrives in the post hopefully later this week. I’ll take some pics for reference purposes. I can’t substantiate it but I’ve heard from several sources they used left over receivers/furniture. How true this is I am not sure but may make sense in that tooling up for just a low volume rifle wouldn’t make economical sense.
We certainly look forward to seeing it.
While it’s ‘possible’ that old parts were used, consider that production ended 85 years ago, and the French government dynamited the main factory buildings after they were done with them. I rather doubt that factory personnel were able to save much of anything, and definitely not 1,000 piece lots of anything, especially receivers. With modern coordinate measuring machines and cnc machining, ‘tooling up’ entails measuring the part to be made, and using the data to write programs to machine new parts. Modern machining in done with ‘insert tooling’ the actual cutting edges small & changeable. The more difficult part would be how to make the parts LOOK like they were made on original machinery.

Looking forward to photos!
 

Greenmachine

Well-known member
Finally,

Got the rifle today and Im very pleasantly surprised. The seller confirmed this model was low volume and less made than the G98 they also produced.

The only 'new' machined parts on the rifle are the receiver, bolt and barrel. It appears everything else was left over/aquired Mauser parts the factory still had. This is supported by different numbers on the barrel bands to the butt plate. Interestingly, I believe the the butt plate has a Waffenamt stamp on it which I really did not expect.

The seller also confirmed the woodwork has WW2 markings on it inside. I'll be honest, I'm not brave enough yet to take it apart but he has also sold some equally beautifully preserved rifles and I have no reason to doubt him or the RFD who sells on his behalf.

So, overall, Im really chuffed. I intend writing to the 'now' Mauser factory to see if they can provide any other information on these rifles as finding out anything is really hard. As a guide, it was £1,000. Have just got to work out how the hell to load pictures up now !
 

Greenmachine

Well-known member
Finally!
 

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Greenmachine

Well-known member
Rifle batch number (not serial number) ++95
Mauser Crest
 

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Stan

Senior Member
First one of these I've seen. The butt plate is marked exactly the same as the Norwegian used K98k's with the old s/n lined out and new one above. Perhaps they were the source for stocks and bands?
 

Greenmachine

Well-known member
I know there are two sorts of butt plates they used, mine and one as per the advert...overall, the rifle is a curious mix of new mauser and old mauser!
 

Gerst

Senior Member
It’s nice that they used all milled parts. Looks pretty good. Are there any test proofs indicating it to be safe to fire?
 

Greenmachine

Well-known member
For me, it's a really interesting rifle I've been after for a while - Im intrigued where they got the stocks from. I've only ever seen one other well over a year ago which had a different butt to my one so it would follow they looked around buying them from various known sources before committing to building them. It would also explain why people felt, at the time, their finish was not as good as the G98 also made. However, the action is really silky smooth. Someone on another site commented its been sanded and laquered - probably was, by Mauser - when they built it so I really dont care :)

As for the previous UK owner , he is now in his 70's - had it from new, using it occasionally. so yes, test proofed accordingly. He also had a gorgoeus G98 I missed but am hoping the buyer of that one chnages his mind and lets me have it :)
 

Fal Grunt

Senior Member
Here please add these over On Bruce 98k site where that talk about The Jubilee 98k made up at Oberndorf in 1997 period from war time parts re finished and New stock etc Mauser did Not sell more than a few hundred as the G 98 model was the one most buyers wanted and those sold well even at 1000$ each etc.Pics of Catalog cover 1998 then adds for the 2 models. Thanks , Jon
 

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Jakeman664

Junior Member
Interesting that they had enough wartime made parts laying around in 1998 to assemble rifles out of, I would assume most had been used up during the war and on French occupation or in maintenance for Bundeswehr rifles they kept on hand. Wonder what they have in old warehouses nowadays?
 

Greenmachine

Well-known member
Here please add these over On Bruce 98k site where that talk about The Jubilee 98k made up at Oberndorf in 1997 period from war time parts re finished and New stock etc Mauser did Not sell more than a few hundred as the G 98 model was the one most buyers wanted and those sold well even at 1000$ each etc.Pics of Catalog cover 1998 then adds for the 2 models. Thanks , Jon
Ty Jon!

Very interesting to read your comments. As I mentioned above, as they have most certainly used wartime stocks/butts/bands, the finish is different to the wholly new G98 they made. The bolt/Receiver are incredibly silky smooth which you expect for an action made in more modern times. I suspect the more ‘field-finish’ nature of the K made it less desirable and therefore not as well known.

Happy to post my stuff on the other thread/site. Forgive me, do you have a link I can follow?
 

Greenmachine

Well-known member
I
Interesting that they had enough wartime made parts laying around in 1998 to assemble rifles out of, I would assume most had been used up during the war and on French occupation or in maintenance for Bundeswehr rifles they kept on hand. Wonder what they have in old warehouses nowadays?
I read the ‘new’ Mauser website the other day. They allude to new projects on it but don’t say much else!
 

Fal Grunt

Senior Member
On the jubilee 98k Mauser obtained many of the war time parts from various lands as surplus materials. Receivers were all re ground to new finish before re bluing as were other parts . There were No left over parts from French Occupation period etc. Add these comments to Talks. Thanks, Jon
 

Greenmachine

Well-known member
On the jubilee 98k Mauser obtained many of the war time parts from various lands as surplus materials. Receivers were all re ground to new finish before re bluing as were other parts . There were No left over parts from French Occupation period etc. Add these comments to Talks. Thanks, Jon
Re the receivers - that I didn’t know! I’d expected new tooling for them. Wow. Ty for sharing that.
 

Greenmachine

Well-known member
Further update:

Thanks to the encyclopaedic nature of this site, I am now sure the Mauser stock used on my rifle is Norwegian. There is a dowel running horizontal in the bolt cut out which I now know is a Norgie thing. That, plus the butt plate number ruled out and another one applied is also (as mentioned here) a typically seen thing.
 

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