Third Party Press

question about block letters

FNmauser18

Junior Member
Do block letters correspond among all the individual manufacturers or did each manufacturer produce 10,000 per each block of their own. I hope this question even makes sense. Was this system used for the entire production of k98 rifles, if not what year did they start using block letters? Also did the letters go from a-z or did it start over after a certain letter?

Thanks for answering a newbies question.
 

Stan

Senior Member
Here is a recent post that mostly should explain your question. https://www.k98kforum.com/showthrea...ck-)-letter-codes&highlight=s/n+letter+blocks

To further answer. The same system was used early on by all manufacturers, but how quickly the blocks got used up depended on production volume at the given factory. For higher production manufacturers, double letter blocks started after single letter blocks got used up for that year, starting with aa block, bb, cc, etc.
 

FNmauser18

Junior Member
Thanks for the reply and the post did help with understanding the significance of the letter codes, I think I may have to do some heavy research on this subject as well as all the other waffenamts of these rifles. I found a chart online that list different waffenamts and it in itself is quite intimidating. Gives me a great respect for the tried and true collectors who can look at a 80 year old rifles markings and be able to identify all the parts sources of manufacture and whether the rifle is a correct combination of parts or if things are out of place.

Thanks again
 

Bob in OHIO

Senior Member
So, before '43 the block system was used universally.... then things get more convoluted.

For example, in 1943 Brunn I (dot) began K98s and used serials (1 to 9999/10000) and just kept going with the alphabet series into '44. That is, in '44 they did not start over with no letter, then a, b... for their block designations. Rather, Brunn I was in the "v" block at the end of '43, and just continued. After "z", they went to "aa", ab" ac... ... aw.

Brunn 1 is the only mfg to use the letter "a" to start all of their two letter blocks designations (others used the convention: aa, bb, cc, dd...).

Finally, Brunn 1 finally did roll back to 1 (presumably) and numbered sequentially into 5 digits, with no alpha. After 100000, they returned to 1a, 2a, 3a....

Here are some examples that can confuse (looking at a "dot 1944 rifles")
  • a four digit serial ie., 6478 dot 1944, would actually be a late '44 gun
  • Serial 4046 a, "dot 1944" would be an even later gun than above
  • 4234 Z, "dot 1944" would be a very early 1944 made gun
 

Stan

Senior Member
Thanks Bob. That link didn't get into the unique serialization at Brunn I in 1944! One of those anomalies that you pick up when reading more about the K98k. As I recall from Vol. I, there was also a rollover in letter blocks at Mauser Oberndorf in 1934-35 early production before the final numbering convention was set in place.
 

FNmauser18

Junior Member
Very interesting info on the Brunn rifles Bob, I think I have the gist on what block letters signify and that at least until 1943 it was mostly a universal standard among the manufacturers. I think I may pick up volume 2 of the book for reference.
 

Humbarger

Senior Member
So theoretically there were bolt bodies for example from the different manufacturers
With the same serial numbers and letter blocks?
 

bnz41john

Senior Member
So theoretically there were bolt bodies for example from the different manufacturers
With the same serial numbers and letter blocks?

Yes. There are way more then one k98k with the "same" serial numbers. Year and manufacturer are important when logging these rifles in. Alot of people dont add that. Ive seen rifles confiscated by the police as a stolen firearm because it has the same serial number as a stolen one in their database, even though its not the same rifle.

John.
 

heavy_mech

RKI- Reasonably Knowledgable Individual
So theoretically there were bolt bodies for example from the different manufacturers
With the same serial numbers and letter blocks?

Absolutely. Depending on the year there could be as many as 7 or 8 let's say 2713 c bolt bodies. Acceptance primarily and font tell the difference.

And I was only talking about ONE year. Taken across the spectrum there would be dozens.. especially up to say 50-100k. Lower numbers every maker hit each year they produced.
 
Last edited:

Stan

Senior Member
Yes. There are way more then one k98k with the "same" serial numbers. Year and manufacturer are important when logging these rifles in. Alot of people dont add that. Ive seen rifles confiscated by the police as a stolen firearm because it has the same serial number as a stolen one in their database, even though its not the same rifle.

John.




Yes, I have heard similar stories regarding "stolen" rifle s/n reports. A good example of why it's important to make note of the maker, year and letter block as well. Unfortunately, many sellers don't list those details on the ATF form, or police report and that probably gives you multitudes of possible "matching" numbers for any given stolen rifle s/n.
 

Military Rifle Journal
Top