Third Party Press

S/42 1936 Matching but...

Maximvs

Active member
IMG_E3269.JPGIMG_E3255.JPG
I purchased this rifle thinking it was a bring back war prize. The inset eagle seems to be from a Wehrmacht cap badge. The numbers are all matching, including the stock. I realize the stock is not a standard 98k stock and am wondering if it might be a GEW98 stock. It is not drilled for a cleaning rod, although the lug has a hole in it. Both handguard and stock are numbered to the receiver which has been drilled and tapped for a scope. The bolt is also matching. The barrel appears to be reblued, along with a blued bolt, and the rest of the receiver has a parkerized finish that almost looks like a powder coating or even a sprayed on finish. I don't recognize the circled symbol on the left side of the buttstock. I have more pictures but I'm being told they are too big to upload here. Any insights will be appreciated.IMG_E3259.JPG
 

Jakeman664

Junior Member
I don't want to ask what you paid. Hopefully no more than $400 or $500 (though that might even be too high). Pictures can be uploaded to a site like imgur and the album linked here. Or look up free photo resizing software.
 

Maximvs

Active member
I don't want to ask what you paid. Hopefully no more than $400 or $500. Pictures can be uploaded to a site like imgur and the album linked here. Or look up free photo resizing software.
I don't remember what I paid; I have had it several years. Any explanation for the non traditional configuration. Thanks for the image help.
 

hale1940

Senior Member
Lots wrong here. For starters the stock is 100% not original to the rifle. The metal finish is clearly redone in some way. And the front barrel band is of the later stamped variation.
 

Maximvs

Active member
Yes sounds like someone found a post war K98k stock and renumbered it to match. And added a fake eagle to the stock.
Why fake? The drilled and tapped receiver make me think a WW2 vet did all this. Why would a cap eagle be inletted into the stock and who would bother to match all the numbers? The work done on it obviously shows no regard for authentic restoration, collectibility or appearance.
 

Jakeman664

Junior Member
The 98k collectors market has exploded in the last decade as more younger people discovered them. Matching rifles always bring more money so there is a financial incentive for fakers to make parts number matching as it increases their profit. The cap eagle is the same as people carving SS runes or skulls on the stock. Gives it an air of legitimacy to new buyers who think it looks cool or more authentic. A ww2 vet would not have done that as it is not a WW2 era stock.
 

Maximvs

Active member
This is a great example of "Buy the book before you buy the item". With even a small bit of study you could have recognized across the room that this is an Israeli stock, not to mention the other list of problems that this rifle has. :( o_O
Clearly, this is not a collectible rifle in the traditional sense. My interest, however, was, how it might have gotten to this state. The receiver and bolt are matching. The stock is numbered to the rest of the gun. If someone were trying to fake something, this would be an unlikely candidate.
 

swjXE

Senior Member
Clearly, this is not a collectible rifle in the traditional sense. My interest, however, was, how it might have gotten to this state. The receiver and bolt are matching. The stock is numbered to the rest of the gun. If someone were trying to fake something, this would be an unlikely candidate.
Max, No offence meant. Just realize that now with the sad state of humanity and the world, everything is subject to fakery. The Israeli stamp on the stock, the short grasping grooves and a cupped buttplate on a solid birch stock are an immediate red flag, and always be suspicious of a cap eagle inletted into the stock.
 
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Maximvs

Active member
Max, No offence meant. Just realize that now with the sad state of humanity and the world, everything is subject to fakery. The Israeli stamp on the stock and the short grasping grooves are an immediate red flag ,and always be suspicious of a cap eagle inletted into the stock.
SwjXE, I appreciate this reply. I agree; it is easy to be cynical in these times, skepticism, however is healthy. I was willing to make a small investment in this odd gun just to find out more about it. It shoots great, by the way. I value your experience and expertise.
 

swjXE

Senior Member
If I told you I've never been burned on a collectable I'd be telling a bold faced lie. If it shoots great and it was mine, I'd just replace the stock and be quite pleased with it. :) (y)
 

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