Third Party Press

Screamer1914 Erfurt Kar98a

chrisftk

Senior Member
Hi all,

I walked into a local shop and was lucky enough to snag this. It's a tricky maker/date to find matching, let alone in this condition. I think the only knock is that it's not unit marked and the bands are a bit worn. Otherwise, crispy stock, nice bluing on the receiver, minty bolt and plenty of fire blue left where appropriate. The parts are all factory matching.

Based on my recollection, they made about 50K of these in 1914 (?) and this was one of the first at #270 in the no-suffix block.

Anyway, here is the data:

Receiver 270
Barrel: 270 BSI 2 (neat double strike eagle)
Front Sight 70
Rear Sight Leaf 70
Sight Slider 70
Ejector Box 70
Trigger Sear 70
Front Barrel Band 70
Rear Barrel Band 70
Trigger Guard 270
Trigger Guard Screws 70, 70
Floor Plate 70
Follower 70
Stock 270
Handguard : 270
Buttplate 270
Bayonet Lug 70
Stacking Hook 70
Bolt Body 70
Extractor 70
Safety 70
Cocking Piece 70
Bolt Sleeve 70
Firing Pin 70

Thanks for looking

IMG_20210504_182842442.jpgIMG_20210504_182909147.jpgIMG_20210504_182923960.jpgIMG_20210504_182931695.jpgIMG_20210504_182949279.jpgIMG_20210504_183010863.jpgIMG_20210504_183018980.jpgIMG_20210504_183031137_HDR.jpgIMG_20210504_183037273_HDR.jpgIMG_20210504_183056906.jpgIMG_20210504_183113952_HDR.jpgIMG_20210504_183125831_HDR.jpgIMG_20210504_183229482_HDR.jpgIMG_20210504_183257318_HDR.jpgIMG_20210504_183308545_HDR.jpgIMG_20210504_183316110_HDR.jpgIMG_20210504_183326518.jpg
 
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Rutche

Senior Member
So, dumbish question, why are buttplates always the one thing on these rifles, and carbines with the most patina, and usually rust. My 98a, and Gewehr 98 are the same way, and many other pictures ive seen
 

chrisftk

Senior Member
Nice rifle! That crisp stock is awesome.
Sure is! Those stock stamps and that bolt cutout are really crisp. I also noticed the color on the ejector box. Nice piece.
awsome rifle! im always happy to hear when they are found locally
Excellent....congrats!
You know how I feel about it Chris, congrats!!
Thanks guys!
So, dumbish question, why are buttplates always the one thing on these rifles, and carbines with the most patina, and usually rust. My 98a, and Gewehr 98 are the same way, and many other pictures ive seen
These were often stored vertically with the buttplate on the ground. It was also not a part that was given attention on routine maintenance. You'll see clean ones but usually that means they were collector enhanced.

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Muncher 1953

Senior Member
Beautiful!!

An amazing example of turn-of-the-century craftsmanship & pride in the product by the workmen. many south american contract rifles of the era show this as well, 1909 DWM-made argentine rifles in my experience.

gorgeous, thanks for sharing!
 

Loewe

Moderator²
I agree its a screamer, damn near new in some respects!

Good estimate so far, 5000/d block is confirmed high, though only one in this last block (9 in the c-block); true too that few are this nice and original, - needless to say on the pristine state this is in.

** most Erfurt/14's known are not unit marked but I would have to check how many even have original stocks, probably not many and therefor not representative enough to place much credence to an opinion of how common the practice was in 1914, but I think I read in Görtz/Bryan that is was being dispensed with earlier and by 1914 the 98a was only lagging because of the nature of its employment (not all that important in the front lines)

Based on my recollection, they made about 50K of these in 1914 (?) and this was one of the first at #270 in the no-suffix block.
 

chrisftk

Senior Member
I agree its a screamer, damn near new in some respects!

Good estimate so far, 5000/d block is confirmed high, though only one in this last block (9 in the c-block); true too that few are this nice and original, - needless to say on the pristine state this is in.

** most Erfurt/14's known are not unit marked but I would have to check how many even have original stocks, probably not many and therefor not representative enough to place much credence to an opinion of how common the practice was in 1914, but I think I read in Görtz/Bryan that is was being dispensed with earlier and by 1914 the 98a was only lagging because of the nature of its employment (not all that important in the front lines)
Thanks Paul, I was quite pleased when I saw it on the rack at the shop! Not often stuff like this shows up in my area.

I would be curious to see if there are any earlier no-letter block examples in your records.

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