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SS SSR Question

DogDoc

Well-known member
In the Karabiner 98k book, volume IIb, page 722, it states "To simplify, the "SS2" skull should be viewed as a depot repair stamp, not a build stamp." I'm a little confused. From what I can gather, my rifle was a SS depot build at Dachau in September, 1940, not a rebuild. Does that mean the because it was a Gew98 conversion it's considered a rebuild? Also, what might be the explanation for the missing HWZ stamp on the SSR?

Thanks,
Jay
 

mrfarb

No War Eagles For You!
Staff member
It is because your rifle is a repaired Gew98. I’ve yet to see a rifle built from new parts with the SS2 barrel stamp, that’s what we call a build. The HWZ stamp is on the scope mount, which yours is missing.
 

DogDoc

Well-known member
That is what I assumed but you know what they say about assuming. To be clear, a depot "build" is technically a rebuild by definition? What does the star on the barrel shoulder represent? Would the SN be the SN that was on the Gew barrel/receiver and then stamped everywhere else at the depot?
 

mrfarb

No War Eagles For You!
Staff member
A depot build is a rifle completely assembled from new main components, not recycled or rebuilt. Think of a car - if you take an old car frame and put all new panels it’s not a new car, it’s a rebuild. Nobody knows what the star represents yet, and yes the original Gew serials were utilized when they rebuilt them.
 

DogDoc

Well-known member
A depot build is a rifle completely assembled from new main components, not recycled or rebuilt. Think of a car - if you take an old car frame and put all new panels it’s not a new car, it’s a rebuild. Nobody knows what the star represents yet, and yes the original Gew serials were utilized when they rebuilt them.
So there would have been boxes of spare parts from various factories in the depots that the armorers would have built from? Such as the rear sight from Mauser.
 

mauser99

Senior Member
I think you are over thinking things a bit.. This can happen when trying to hard to figure things out.. This rifle rebuild would be no different than re building an engine.. All the parts than can be re used are re-used and some items modified and improved some replaced . The rear sight of the Gew98 was replaced with the flat site for the Ss cartridge. This was done across the boards and the Gew98m was born large amounts were converted. This was only part of it. Mauser the primary producer made most all these parts. Some BSW parts were also used. Rear wide lower bands were made by another firm. All these things were needed to make a Gew98 to a Gew98m. Then there were Gew98 to kar98k conversions which required barrel replacement or shortening depending on the bore condition.

Early Snipers were not built from scratch they were picked from standard stocks from highly accurate examples after test firing. This rifle was chosen then typically sent to s second depot or sub department that specialized in adding the mount and optics and it was dialed in.

A scope and mount for your rifle are out there. Start saving as to buy one will cost many thousands of dollars but, money well spent as it was double the value of what you have.
 

DogDoc

Well-known member
I think you are over thinking things a bit.. This can happen when trying to hard to figure things out.. This rifle rebuild would be no different than re building an engine.. All the parts than can be re used are re-used and some items modified and improved some replaced . The rear sight of the Gew98 was replaced with the flat site for the Ss cartridge. This was done across the boards and the Gew98m was born large amounts were converted. This was only part of it. Mauser the primary producer made most all these parts. Some BSW parts were also used. Rear wide lower bands were made by another firm. All these things were needed to make a Gew98 to a Gew98m. Then there were Gew98 to kar98k conversions which required barrel replacement or shortening depending on the bore condition.

Early Snipers were not built from scratch they were picked from standard stocks from highly accurate examples after test firing. This rifle was chosen then typically sent to s second depot or sub department that specialized in adding the mount and optics and it was dialed in.

A scope and mount for your rifle are out there. Start saving as to buy one will cost many thousands of dollars but, money well spent as it was double the value of what you have.
I appreciate that. I do tend to overthink things. I love history and I love learning about this. Y'all's input is GREATLY appreciated. It is absolutely fascinating (and somewhat eerie) to think a Jewish POW may have built to some degree my rifle. I have a M1 carbine made in a typewriter plant. It really is the most amazing period in history.

It's not for sale but I would be curious what my rifle might be worth.

Side note: Yesterday I was helping my parents clean their attic out and found a box of my grandmothers. Inside I found her blue star banner. I thought it was a goner.
 

DogDoc

Well-known member
How can I determine who made my barrel? The only marks on it are the SN, the SS2 death’s head, a star and 7,9 on the shoulder, 940 and the eagle N proof mark underneath and a cursive K or H (I believe) in a box.
 

mauser99

Senior Member
there are others out there more versed than me on Barrel markings.. To complicate even more there were barrel blank providers and then finishers. Just like machine shops today they order stock then finish the items from stock. The barrel blank providers would ship blanks to finishers for completion. Some larger firms did both.

The K could indicate Krupp Stahl. But this is just a guess. They did make a lions share of the blanks for obvious reasons.
 

DogDoc

Well-known member
there are others out there more versed than me on Barrel markings.. To complicate even more there were barrel blank providers and then finishers. Just like machine shops today they order stock then finish the items from stock. The barrel blank providers would ship blanks to finishers for completion. Some larger firms did both.

The K could indicate Krupp Stahl. But this is just a guess. They did make a lions share of the blanks for obvious reasons.
The Krupp theory makes sense. I just feel with a company of that magnitude that stamp would be somewhere.
 

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