Third Party Press

SS & WaA stamped Thompson M1A1

JasonGTA

Junior Member
Hello everyone, this Thompson M1A1 sold at auction today up here in Canada. Supposedly it was in an air drop that missed its target and got into the Germans' hands in Yugoslavia. What are all your thoughts about it? Seems off to me
 

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Zeppelin5000

Senior Member
Jesus... not only are people out there faking German weapons and gear, but they are faking Allied weapons and gear... with German marks!

Bottom line, people know there is money in anything WWII German and they try to cash in on it.
 

Amberg

Senior Member
Beautiful BS story about its history.
The Talking WaffenThompson tells all! Lol
I agree with you, but please keep in mind that the German occupation forces in France captured an average of 4-500 STEN SMGs per month until mid 1944! All of them were air dropped by the British. In some special operations against French resistance forces in April 1944, the Germans had captured nearly 5,000 STEN guns, plus rifles, pistols, LMGs, antitank weapons, and tons of ammunition.
The SS had some maintenance and repair workshops for weapons. One of these workshops was located in the Stutthof concentration camp. From their daily reports it is known that they also had US SMGs, Argentine (HAFDASA) .45 caliber pistols (from British commando units), and Italian, French, US ..... rifles, pistols, etc. + ammunition in stock.
In August 1944, 540 STEN guns and 50 British LMGs were shipped to Saloniki (Greece).
It is not known where the US SMGs ended up.
 

RyanE

Baby Face
Staff member
Sure, but in this case the WaA241 - Abnahmestelle Mauser- makes no sense........
His point is that the SS did rework US and British weapons. This example is obviously bad, but there were SS reworked US weapons to include Thompson. How (or even if) they were marked by the shop at Stutthof is unknown.
 

Iasc300ia

Senior Member
His point is that the SS did rework US and British weapons. This example is obviously bad, but there were SS reworked US weapons to include Thompson. How (or even if) they were marked by the shop at Stutthof is unknown.
Are there any photos of legitimate SS marked captured Thompson smgs?
 

Amberg

Senior Member
I very much doubt that the SS marked the captured/repaired weapons.
But that is only a guess from a WWI collector. ;)
BTW: Keitel (Army) and Himmler (SS/Police) had a nasty argument about the ownership of such captured weapons from France.
In the end they shared them nearly equally.
 
His point is that the SS did rework US and British.....

No doubt about this.
My point ist that the appearance of the SS Zeugamt stamp in combination with 241 WaA makes no sense on an M1A1.
A lot of guns that came back from former Yugoslavia in 1945 ended in the austrian Wörther See (Lake). In the 1990s around 150 1928A1 and M1A1 surfaced with several 100s other, mostly not german made weapons. Not one of the 1928s ore M1A1 had any german acceptance mark.
 

Absolut

Senior Member
I'm very certain this gun originates from those that were sent as war aid to Russia in WWII. These remained unused in stock until somewhen in 2000s where all 20,000 were bought by an European dealer. This dealer has good connections to Canada and sells frequently to Canada.

The ones mentioned from lakes in Carinthia, these are British weapons they dumped when they left their occupation zone. These still turn up nowadays and have British acceptance stamps on them and/or British swivel configuration.
 

DogDoc

Well-known member
I'm very certain this gun originates from those that were sent as war aid to Russia in WWII. These remained unused in stock until somewhen in 2000s where all 20,000 were bought by an European dealer. This dealer has good connections to Canada and sells frequently to Canada.

The ones mentioned from lakes in Carinthia, these are British weapons they dumped when they left their occupation zone. These still turn up nowadays and have British acceptance stamps on them and/or British swivel configuration.
That is very interesting, Georg. So a Thompson with a British acceptance mark would not be rare then??
 

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