Third Party Press

Steaming Hot Turd

mto7464

Senior Member
So let me get this straight someone took a pretty cool variation of a k98k and ruined it by changing the date? I don't think the person realize that was actually at JP Sauer manufactured rifle using a Gustloff receiver. I guess they thought making it dated 42 would make it rarer over something made in 44?
Yes I noticed the final right away. Sad.
 

Stan

Senior Member
I consider "Bubba" to be anyone who butchers or modifies old surplus rifles. Usually he just does it to make it look "pretty" rather than faking things to sell. I guess in this case "turd monger" might be a better name!
 
Turns out my grandpa was Bubba. Poor Enfield.
In my opinion this is very mild compared to what was done to the 98, the seller likely defaced it to try to scam somebody to make some extra change. Judging by the date on that photo your grandpa likely lived through the war, guns from a war so recent were looked at completely different in those days. I curse anybody who sporterizes war rifles nowadays but likely your grandpa just wanted to shoot some deer and chose the cheapest rifle you could get in those days. That picture is badass and i would be proud of it.
 

kampfy

Senior Member
Turns out my grandpa was Bubba. Poor Enfield.
They way I see it if the individual took the time to properly setup and mount a scope, remove both the iron sights if the mount made them unusable and (if necessary) any bolt modification was done well, the rifle is not a bubba gun. For me bubba guns are reserved for those where the owner chopped down the stock, perhaps added a recoil pad and did nothing else.

There are some really well done sporterized rifles out there and while they’re not in my purchasing/collecting wheelhouse I can still appreciate them nonetheless
 

wolfgolf96

Senior Member
In my opinion this is very mild compared to what was done to the 98, the seller likely defaced it to try to scam somebody to make some extra change. Judging by the date on that photo your grandpa likely lived through the war, guns from a war so recent were looked at completely different in those days. I curse anybody who sporterizes war rifles nowadays but likely your grandpa just wanted to shoot some deer and chose the cheapest rifle you could get in those days. That picture is badass and i would be proud of it.
There was a hint of sarcasm with that statement haha. They were cheap, plentiful, and great hunting rifles. I agree, there is a big difference between making it a more functional hunting rifle for sustaining yourself and your family. Compared to pimping out to look “tak-tic-kool” or trying to scam someone with a turd.
 

Gerst

Senior Member
I consider "Bubba" to be anyone who butchers or modifies old surplus rifles. Usually he just does it to make it look "pretty" rather than faking things to sell. I guess in this case "turd monger" might be a better name!
I may be a bubba. I always remove corrosion and do my best to restore the weapon as much as possible without making drastic changes.
 

Gerst

Senior Member
Ah, yes, from the era of "sporterized" rifles. Former military guns were common and cheap at the time. Great photo!
The “early” sport jobs were butchery. Instead of removing the metal from the stock and putting it into a new sport-stock, the stock was simply sawed down to the desired length, the “extra” parts- hand guard, bands, bayonet lug, etc. - were simply tossed or later lost. That was wrong, but back in the 60s these rifles were cheap and still plentiful, just like beer.
 

2ndGaCav

Member
My uncle bought a 1918 BSA Enfield No.1 MkIII* for "$20" in the early fifties (I think he said he bought it out of the Sears catalog). He bought some ammo, took it to the range, and blasted the hell out of it. Loved it, but didn't like the blunt-nosed SMLE look and the fore-end weight, so he cut it down in his garage in the 50's AND THREW AWAY THE ORIGINAL, NUMBERED NOSE CAP. He was a "Bubba," but no one cared back then. Surplus rifles were cheap, plentiful and not collectible (to them). He said that most folks wanted to get away from "World Wars" and "Battle Rifles" anyway, and to a guy who didn't have a lot of money, he got a nice, centerfire rifle to hunt with for a couple days' wages. So cutting it up made sense to him at the time. He gave it me just before he died, and I have tried to restore it to its original glory, but I'll never find the matching Nose Cap again, and stock wood without "Ishy Screws" is ridiculous to find or afford. But it still occasionally carries a bayonet and shoots a little. Not bad in the end...
 

Gringo

Member
I think Dave is just trying to scam us out of having a shot at this magnificent specimen. Thankfully I was able to skate over and take a screenshot of the bidding war going on for this awesome GI BRINGBACK from Belgiom in 1944!

Screenshot (315).png
 

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