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VZ.24 cleaning tools and practices?

33yn2

Member
I recently got a VZ.24 and a Yugoslavian M24/47 and haven't yet gone shooting with them, but before I do I would like to figure out everything I need to know for cleaning. I've only ever cleaned pistols before, and with these being such old rifles, I want to ensure I clean them properly.

Is there places I should avoid touching with any kind of oil? I am assuming anything in the magazine/follower area really doesn't really need to ever be touched except for removing any residue on the top of the feeder itself with a cloth coated in ballastol after going to the range? As I presume if the gun is in good working order I don't really need to touch those?

As for the outside, I know that wiping the metal down with some ballistol can help protect it from rust since my VZ.24's finish is gone, and I can also use it to wipe down the wood after handling it to wipe off my hand oils without damaging the wood?

When I search about these rifles online I just get a bunch of information about other guns or video games, and nothing really relevant. Youtube turns up videos on how to strip down the rifle, but I didn't see anything that suggested what parts should be cleaned, oiled, what to avoid, etc. Further, would it be worth getting a barrel guide for cleaning?

I'm also curious why the RG 34 kits had a pull through when the rifle itself came with a cleaning rod? Is that because the pull through can move with the rifling and potentially get into the nooks that you might miss with just the rod? Or was it because the RG 34 kits were used for other weapons?

Thanks!
 

Muncher 1953

Senior Member
#1: ALWAYS clean from the chamber end, the muzzle & crown have everything to do with accuracy & are subject to some wear when cleaning.
#2: “never” clean with a steel rod. Yes the cleaning rods were/are made of steel, but almost all period cleaning was done with the RG34. Consider the effort & expense that went into the cleaning chains, clad with special aluminum beads (at least earlier versions)
#3: Ballistol is (mostly) what was used in-period, but many folks use Hoppe’s #9 or other popular modern products. I’ve found that using the chain & wicks (a modern equivalent is available, I think I paid ~$13.50 for 1,000 wicks) I’ve been quite surprised at how much & the kind of crud they pull out. Remember that there’s a LOT more barrel surface area to clean than any handgun, 23-5/8” of it, including the chamber. Take your time & clean thoroughly. Oil afterwards.
 
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runner

Senior Member
The cleaning rods on the K98k was not intended to be used for routine cleaning as Muncher pointed out. It took three rods screwed together to get the required length, and steel segmented Rods are not good for the rifling or muzzle crown.
My own opinion is the rod sections were for emergencies, such as removing a stuck case, and primarily as a means to stack rifles.
 

33yn2

Member
Thank you so much!

Do you think it would hurt to apply Renaissance Wax onto the stock to help protect it? I hear it can be removed easily and won't damage it.

Also, the only thing I'm still wondering is how often do you think I should need to fully strip down the rifle to get into the follower and magazine sell, as well as clean the bolt and firing pin itself?
 

Muncher 1953

Senior Member
Thank you so much!

Do you think it would hurt to apply Renaissance Wax onto the stock to help protect it? I hear it can be removed easily and won't damage it.

Also, the only thing I'm still wondering is how often do you think I should need to fully strip down the rifle to get into the follower and magazine sell, as well as clean the bolt and firing pin itself?
I have no experience w/Renaissance Wax so I won’t comment on that. Some folks here do use it.

To me, ‘fully strip the rifle’ means taking the barreled receiver out of the stock, & just about every other metal piece separated from its sisters, then soaked or wiped with patches moist w/solvent. I wouldn’t touch the recoil lug & nut, rear action screw bushing, bayonet lug & pin & maybe butt plate, unless there was a good reason to. I only do that to a new-to-me rifle, as part of an overall assessment of ‘what is there’ & what the condition is. Again after being out in the rain, or some other exposure to wet air. Then only every year or so if conditions are very good (DRY). I look at the weapons to see if they look dry.

In theory, & as designed, if you don’t experience a pierced primer, you don’t need to clean the bolt face, mag well, follower, spring or floor plate every time you shoot the rifle. But in reality, you probably should, because chambers aren’t always concentric, brass isn’t always up to size, primers don’t always fit their pockets tightly. Modern ammo isn’t too bad, but if you’re shooting ‘corrosive’ (wartime, & often postwar surplus military ammo) then I would clean everything that combustion gasses might leak into. If you haven’t stripped down the bolt, you should. Watch some vids or get a friend to show you how the 1st time, there are some things that can bite your fingers! Leave no tool marks! Easy tip: after shooting, wipe the bolt face with a patch or swap moistened in solvent. Did it come away clean, or dirty? If clean, I’d clean less stuff, but if any soot is present, then go farther.

Dropping the floor plate isn’t that hard, just takes a strong push on the relese pin with a punch or other NON-MARRING tool, while pushing the plate towards the trigger bow. Then you can lightly wipe down follower, spring & plate, the inside walls of the mag well. Crud collects in there, & crud can hold moisture, a rifle’s mortal enemy!
 

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